X
Tap here to go to the mobile version of the site.

Support Forum

How to embed a YouTube video in a formatted email?

Posted

There are several answers that do not work, but none in the last year or two, so I'm asking again. I want to write a formatted personal email to my wife that plays a YouTube video as soon as it's opened, or at least shows the YouTube screen that can be clicked to start the video playing. I want complete and tested instructions, just as I'd give to someone who asked a question I can answer. If you can't answer, thanks anyway but please don't post, thanks. Environment: sending: Thunderbird 71.0 (64), Windows 10 Home; receiving: Gmail, Windows 8.1.

There are several answers that do not work, but none in the last year or two, so I'm asking again. I want to write a formatted personal email to my wife that plays a YouTube video as soon as it's opened, or at least shows the YouTube screen that can be clicked to start the video playing. I want complete and tested instructions, just as I'd give to someone who asked a question I can answer. If you can't answer, thanks anyway but please don't post, thanks. Environment: sending: Thunderbird 71.0 (64), Windows 10 Home; receiving: Gmail, Windows 8.1.
Quote

Additional System Details

Application

  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64; rv:71.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/71.0

More Information

Erik Thau-Knudsen 0 solutions 2 answers

Did you try to edit the HTML code of the e-mail?

Did you try to edit the HTML code of the e-mail?
Was this helpful to you? 0
Quote

Question owner

No, since I have no idea what to add to it. That is why I posted this question.

No, since I have no idea what to add to it. That is why I posted this question.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Erik Thau-Knudsen 0 solutions 2 answers

Since your account is a Gmail account, you can embed the video by using Gmail's online interface. YouTube has posted an explanation here: How to Embed YouTube Video in Email How to Embed YouTube Video in Email. This, though, doesn't imply any use of Thunderbird.

Since your account is a Gmail account, you can embed the video by using Gmail's online interface. YouTube has posted an explanation here: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhNqc9TtGXM How to Embed YouTube Video in Email] How to Embed YouTube Video in Email. This, though, doesn't imply any use of Thunderbird.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote

Question owner

As I said, I'm sending the email from Thunderbird on Windows 10, not Gmail. As I also said, please don't post if you don't know the answer for sure.

As I said, I'm sending the email from Thunderbird on Windows 10, not Gmail. As I also said, please don't post if you don't know the answer for sure.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Matt
  • Top 10 Contributor
  • Moderator
3400 solutions 23582 answers

You can not is the short answer.

You never have been able to and you are unlikely to ever be able to. So don't bother asking again in a couple of years. The situation, being one involving reducing user security to implement it is unlikely to ever change. The Thunderbird community as a whole is very adverse to increasing user risk from malicious email.

If you do embed the HTML that youtube supply you will get and error that looks something like this

Sending that email to a GMX mail account resulted in a plain URL in the body of the email. Getting it back in Thunderbird nothing displayed in the body at all. The iFrame is ignored in rendering. Email to another mail client might work if the mail client executes JavaScript in emails and supports iframes (they are in the embed source that Youtube provide. But hit and miss would be the best result you could possibly hope for )

Campaign monitor suggest the majority of mail clients do not support iframes. That that is because they represent a security risk in and of themselves. A quick discussion simple discussion here

The mail client also has to execute scripts, in this case JavaScript, in the email body. Thunderbird also does not do that. You can not be infected by opening an email if scripts are disabled/ignored.

Then there is the possibility of using HTML5 video tags in the HTML. This also does not work as youtube does not supply the stream in a format the HTML5 video player can interpret MP4,OOG or Theora.

In reply to @Erik, that might work when sending to gmail accounts. But all that turned up in my GMX account was the basic url I pasted into the message body. This also made it's way to Thunderbird in exactly the same form. No thumb nail.

You can not is the short answer. You never have been able to and you are unlikely to ever be able to. So don't bother asking again in a couple of years. The situation, being one involving reducing user security to implement it is unlikely to ever change. The Thunderbird community as a whole is very adverse to increasing user risk from malicious email. If you do embed the HTML that youtube supply you will get and error that looks something like this <img src=https://user-media-prod-cdn.itsre-sumo.mozilla.net/uploads/images/2020-01-06-16-45-17-f41959.png> Sending that email to a GMX mail account resulted in a plain URL in the body of the email. Getting it back in Thunderbird nothing displayed in the body at all. The iFrame is ignored in rendering. Email to another mail client might work if the mail client executes JavaScript in emails and supports iframes (they are in the embed source that Youtube provide. But hit and miss would be the best result you could possibly hope for ) [https://www.campaignmonitor.com/blog/email-marketing/2019/01/do-iframes-work-in-email/ Campaign monitor ]suggest the majority of mail clients do not support iframes. That that is because they represent a security risk in and of themselves. A quick discussion simple discussion [https://www.ostraining.com/blog/webdesign/against-using-iframes/ here ] The mail client also has to execute scripts, in this case JavaScript, in the email body. Thunderbird also does not do that. You can not be infected by opening an email if scripts are disabled/ignored. Then there is the possibility of using HTML5 video tags in the HTML. This also does not work as youtube does not supply the stream in a format the HTML5 video player can interpret MP4,OOG or Theora. In reply to @Erik, that might work when sending to gmail accounts. But all that turned up in my GMX account was the basic url I pasted into the message body. This also made it's way to Thunderbird in exactly the same form. No thumb nail.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote

Question owner

So, the obvious solution, unless an email client prohibits it, and based on your strangely negative and pessimistic reply, is to use an HTML5 video tag that points to a server that does supply the video in mp4 standard format. HTML5 is supported by all modern browsers.

Since I run a webserver, I can host such videos quite simply. And for those who don't run a webserver, they can use a free video hosting service. I can't spare the time to test this, but it does seem like a good answer to my original question.

So all that is needed for the original question is (solution 1) an app that converts a YouTube video (and there are such apps), or else (solution 2) one can download the video and convert it manually. Or (solution 3) someone can write a PHP program on a server somewhere that, given a YouTube video address, generates and serves the corresponding MP4 video.

And if these solutions don't work because of email clients, we need to change the clients, since there is no security problem with streaming video, especially if the email transmission uses https. How can sending a public video be a security problem?

So, the obvious solution, unless an email client prohibits it, and based on your strangely negative and pessimistic reply, is to use an HTML5 video tag that points to a server that does supply the video in mp4 standard format. HTML5 is supported by all modern browsers. Since I run a webserver, I can host such videos quite simply. And for those who don't run a webserver, they can use a free video hosting service. I can't spare the time to test this, but it does seem like a good answer to my original question. So all that is needed for the original question is (solution 1) an app that converts a YouTube video (and there are such apps), or else (solution 2) one can download the video and convert it manually. Or (solution 3) someone can write a PHP program on a server somewhere that, given a YouTube video address, generates and serves the corresponding MP4 video. And if these solutions don't work because of email clients, we need to change the clients, since there is no security problem with streaming video, especially if the email transmission uses https. How can sending a public video be a security problem?

Modified by David Spector

Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Ask a question

You must log in to your account to reply to posts. Please start a new question, if you do not have an account yet.