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Difference between "Reload" and "Reload (Override Cache)"?

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  • 1 has this problem
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  • Last reply by user1139086

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At https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/keyboard-shortcuts-perform-firefox-tasks-quickly#w_navigation, what is the difference between "Reload" and "Reload (Override Cache)"? What does "override cache" do?

Chosen solution

The purpose of reloading web page(s) and bypass the cache is to get a fresh copy of possibly outdated or corrupted files currently stored in the disk cache. You can do this as the first attempt if a normal reload doesn't seem to be giving an up to date version of a website or if you otherwise experience issues with a website.


We usually advice this in case of issues:

Reload web page(s) and bypass the cache to refresh possibly outdated or corrupted files.

  • Hold down the Shift key and left-click the Reload button
  • Press "Ctrl + F5" or press "Ctrl + Shift + R" (Windows,Linux)
  • Press "Command + Shift + R" (Mac)

Clear the cache and remove cookies only from websites that cause problems. "Clear the Cache":

  • Firefox/Tools > Options > Advanced > Network > Cached Web Content: "Clear Now"

"Remove Cookies" from sites causing problems:

  • Firefox/Tools > Options > Privacy > "Use custom settings for history" > Cookies: "Show Cookies"

Start Firefox in Safe Mode to check if an extension or theme (Firefox/Tools > Add-ons > Extensions) or if hardware acceleration is causing problems.

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All Replies (6)

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Override cache deletes the saved cache data for that site on your computer before refreshing, thus ensuring that all new information is pulled down during the refresh. This is sometimes necessary if a website is acting up on your computer. Normal refresh is sufficient in most cases and is usually faster.

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Isn't that just the same thing as settings > clear browsing data > cache?

Modified by user1139086

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When you reload bypassing the cache (Ctrl+Shift+r), I think Firefox only dumps the earlier copies of the resources used in the current page, leaving the rest of the cache intact. Usually way, way faster than clearing the entire cache, but if you are having to do it on multiple pages, then clearing the whole cache in one go would make more sense.

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Chosen Solution

The purpose of reloading web page(s) and bypass the cache is to get a fresh copy of possibly outdated or corrupted files currently stored in the disk cache. You can do this as the first attempt if a normal reload doesn't seem to be giving an up to date version of a website or if you otherwise experience issues with a website.


We usually advice this in case of issues:

Reload web page(s) and bypass the cache to refresh possibly outdated or corrupted files.

  • Hold down the Shift key and left-click the Reload button
  • Press "Ctrl + F5" or press "Ctrl + Shift + R" (Windows,Linux)
  • Press "Command + Shift + R" (Mac)

Clear the cache and remove cookies only from websites that cause problems. "Clear the Cache":

  • Firefox/Tools > Options > Advanced > Network > Cached Web Content: "Clear Now"

"Remove Cookies" from sites causing problems:

  • Firefox/Tools > Options > Privacy > "Use custom settings for history" > Cookies: "Show Cookies"

Start Firefox in Safe Mode to check if an extension or theme (Firefox/Tools > Add-ons > Extensions) or if hardware acceleration is causing problems.

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Do we need two different threads by the same user that for all practical purpose are the same discussion?

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/1073266

edit - locked that thread

Modified by the-edmeister

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the-edmeister said

Do we need two different threads by the same user that for all practical purpose are the same discussion? https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/1073266 edit - locked that thread

Well way to be rude. And yes, this is actually not the same topic at all. On the other thread I was asking what the purpose between the keys are; on this thread, I'm asking just what the difference between two particular actions within the browser is.