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Workaround for font issues caused by IE10 update

Posted

There is a lot of discussion on https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=812695 about the right workaround or how to apply it. I'm starting this forum thread to move the discussion.

From the bug the current workarounds are:

  • in about:config set gfx.direct2d.disabled to true
  • in about:config set gfx.content.azure.backends to cairo instead of direct2D
  • Uninstall IE10 and update KB2670838
There is a lot of discussion on https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=812695 about the right workaround or how to apply it. I'm starting this forum thread to move the discussion. From the bug the current workarounds are: *in about:config set gfx.direct2d.disabled to true *in about:config set gfx.content.azure.backends to cairo instead of direct2D *Uninstall IE10 and update KB2670838

Additional System Details

Installed Plug-ins

  • Google Update
  • Shockwave Flash 11.7 r700
  • VLC media player Web Plugin 2.0.6
  • Next Generation Java Plug-in 10.21.2 for Mozilla browsers
  • Adobe Shockwave for Director Netscape plug-in, version 12.0.2.122
  • Adobe PDF Plug-In For Firefox and Netscape 11.0.02
  • 5.1.20125.0
  • HP Active Check Plugin
  • HP Product Detection Plugin
  • iTunes Detector Plug-in
  • ActiveGS Emulator 3.5.894
  • 1.3
  • The plug-in allows you to open and edit files using Microsoft Office applications

Application

  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:22.0) Gecko/20130513 Firefox/22.0

More Information

dusty-2011 0 solutions 4 answers

The change in about:config, setting gfx.content.azure.enabled to false, worked beautifully. Unfortunately, I am now having constant Firefox freezing issues. Disabling Azure has a negative effect on browser performance. So, on an already 5-year old laptop it might cause freezing of the browser.

Why did you install Windows 8 on such an old computer anyways? I would have stuck with Vista or upgraded to Windows 7, but not 8. Not on such an old laptop.

''The change in about:config, setting gfx.content.azure.enabled to false, worked beautifully. Unfortunately, I am now having constant Firefox freezing issues.'' Disabling Azure has a negative effect on browser performance. So, on an already 5-year old laptop it might cause freezing of the browser. Why did you install Windows 8 on such an old computer anyways? I would have stuck with Vista or upgraded to Windows 7, but not 8. Not on such an old laptop.
Interceptor1412 0 solutions 4 answers

It's unfortunate to hear the Tuner didn't work, I'm positive that's the only thing I did and for the most part, it's perfect, this page for example, has zero corruption, off the top my head, two websites I browse heavily and are text-heavy (gamefaqs and reddit) also has no corruption. I double checked the aforementioned about:config entries, and the hardware acceleration section of about:support as well, and nothing is out of the ordinary. I even tried a fresh Firefox profile, and on this laptop, the problem is mostly not there, note I said mostly.

The only other ATI card I have is an ancient 5850, but since that's not a R700 card, that won't do much good.

On the Bugzilla thread, they've tried contacting both Microsoft/AMD, AMD already said it's not their fault, and MS haven't said a peep, the bug was filed close to a year ago, so I doubt this will be fixed anytime soon. I'll be interested if this will ever be fixed.

It's unfortunate to hear the Tuner didn't work, I'm positive that's the only thing I did and for the most part, it's perfect, this page for example, has zero corruption, off the top my head, two websites I browse heavily and are text-heavy (gamefaqs and reddit) also has no corruption. I double checked the aforementioned about:config entries, and the hardware acceleration section of about:support as well, and nothing is out of the ordinary. I even tried a fresh Firefox profile, and on this laptop, the problem is mostly not there, note I said mostly. The only other ATI card I have is an ancient 5850, but since that's not a R700 card, that won't do much good. On the Bugzilla thread, they've tried contacting both Microsoft/AMD, AMD already said it's not their fault, and MS haven't said a peep, the bug was filed close to a year ago, so I doubt this will be fixed anytime soon. I'll be interested if this will ever be fixed.
WickedGirl 0 solutions 13 answers

dusty-2011...why would I NOT install Windows 8 or 8.1 on such an old computer? If the Window 7 upgrade assistant flags no issues on the PC (and it did not) and the Windows 8 upgrade assistant flags no issues (and it did not), then it is a no-brainer. That being said, I am a tinkerer. I have been building and tweaking computers (desktops mainly) for 16 years. This is a hobby, it is fun, and I cannot afford new hardware every two years, nor do I particularly wish to be one of THOSE people who fill the landfills with loads of electronic refuse. I also do not turn in perfectly good systems to recycling places so they can make a profit on it if I can keep something running.

I am extremely fond of this little laptop. It is a PITA, but it also has a lot of life left in it and it is one of those that transform into a tablet. One of HPs first ones. It is a trip to see if I can make it run better. When I got it new, it ran Vista, which it had no business doing frankly. Just not enough horsepower in it for that OS. Now Windows 8 is a different animal. It really loves Windows 8, and I suspect that is because the resources are handled so much better in this OS. The laptop is faster and more responsive now. The trick is finding drivers that work, since HP no longer supports this unit. That is not hard so far though.

As for Windows 7...I do NOT have good things to say about that OS. Unlike many who LOVE it, it only took three bluescreens after a Microsoft update to convince me that was not the OS for me. In all my years of PCing, through Windows 95, 98, XP, Vista and 8, I have never had flat out blue screens after a simple MS update session. Not one. I know there are people who do, but maintaining my PCs as I do, I should not see one....and I did not, until Windows 7. Naughty, naughty. Windows 7 is still running on my desktop, because I love a challenge, but when I restart my Computer Security and Forensics courses in January, it will be Windows 8 that I RELY on for my classes. Note that I did not say 8.1. Not yet.

Anyway, this is not the fault of the hardware. It may be my fault for performing a dirty upgrade to 8.1, which I will be remedying today. However, I really believe that between Microsoft's sometimes iffy code work, and Firefox's increasingly bloated, but dumbed down for users and memory leaking POS browser (still my fave after 16 years so I can say this), not to mention Adobe's crap Flash work, our font issue is unlikely to be fixed. It seems, based on all the research I have done and been pointed to, that Adobe has over thought itself on sandboxing in Firefox, Firefox is too FAT, and Microsoft is determined to shove people onto an OS that needs a little more work in an effort to placate the whiny little babies (my spouse included) who cannot do without a gosh darn start button. 8.1 is NOT ready for prime time. Those of us who bought a digital download of Windows 8 and then upgrade to 8.1, cannot even create an installation disk, without jumping through a few hoops. No product key is provided to digital adopters of 8.1, but the Windows 8 key does not work by itself. Bizarre! Luckily, many other people seem to have solved this issue, so I am off to perform a clean install! Cheers!

dusty-2011...why would I NOT install Windows 8 or 8.1 on such an old computer? If the Window 7 upgrade assistant flags no issues on the PC (and it did not) and the Windows 8 upgrade assistant flags no issues (and it did not), then it is a no-brainer. That being said, I am a tinkerer. I have been building and tweaking computers (desktops mainly) for 16 years. This is a hobby, it is fun, and I cannot afford new hardware every two years, nor do I particularly wish to be one of THOSE people who fill the landfills with loads of electronic refuse. I also do not turn in perfectly good systems to recycling places so they can make a profit on it if I can keep something running. I am extremely fond of this little laptop. It is a PITA, but it also has a lot of life left in it and it is one of those that transform into a tablet. One of HPs first ones. It is a trip to see if I can make it run better. When I got it new, it ran Vista, which it had no business doing frankly. Just not enough horsepower in it for that OS. Now Windows 8 is a different animal. It really loves Windows 8, and I suspect that is because the resources are handled so much better in this OS. The laptop is faster and more responsive now. The trick is finding drivers that work, since HP no longer supports this unit. That is not hard so far though. As for Windows 7...I do NOT have good things to say about that OS. Unlike many who LOVE it, it only took three bluescreens after a Microsoft update to convince me that was not the OS for me. In all my years of PCing, through Windows 95, 98, XP, Vista and 8, I have never had flat out blue screens after a simple MS update session. Not one. I know there are people who do, but maintaining my PCs as I do, I should not see one....and I did not, until Windows 7. Naughty, naughty. Windows 7 is still running on my desktop, because I love a challenge, but when I restart my Computer Security and Forensics courses in January, it will be Windows 8 that I RELY on for my classes. Note that I did not say 8.1. Not yet. Anyway, this is not the fault of the hardware. It may be my fault for performing a dirty upgrade to 8.1, which I will be remedying today. However, I really believe that between Microsoft's sometimes iffy code work, and Firefox's increasingly bloated, but dumbed down for users and memory leaking POS browser (still my fave after 16 years so I can say this), not to mention Adobe's crap Flash work, our font issue is unlikely to be fixed. It seems, based on all the research I have done and been pointed to, that Adobe has over thought itself on sandboxing in Firefox, Firefox is too FAT, and Microsoft is determined to shove people onto an OS that needs a little more work in an effort to placate the whiny little babies (my spouse included) who cannot do without a gosh darn start button. 8.1 is NOT ready for prime time. Those of us who bought a digital download of Windows 8 and then upgrade to 8.1, cannot even create an installation disk, without jumping through a few hoops. No product key is provided to digital adopters of 8.1, but the Windows 8 key does not work by itself. Bizarre! Luckily, many other people seem to have solved this issue, so I am off to perform a clean install! Cheers!