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What's the difference between Session Restore and restoring Recently Closed Windows (Ctrl+Shift+N)?

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  • Last reply by fiffox

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Folks frequently bemoan that Firefox doesn't have the same Ctrl+Shift+T keyboard shortcut to Restore Previous Sessions that Chromium has (heck, I'm one of them), but I noticed that Ctrl+Shift+N will restore Previously Closed Windows. From a backend perspective, is there a functional difference between these two options? Does using the Restore Previous Sessions button in the History panel behave differently in regards to, I don't know, cookies or something? I'm a little hazy on what a "session" is and why it's important.

Chosen solution

"Ctrl+Shift+T" is the shortcut to reopen a closed tab and "Ctrl+Shift+N" is the shortcut to reopen a closed window in the current session and if you have used "History -> Restore Previous Session" or otherwise restored the previous session. Firefox doesn't have a shortcut to reopen the previous session like Google Chrome might have according to what you write above. You will have to use the History menu if you want to use "Restore Previous Session".

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Chosen Solution

"Ctrl+Shift+T" is the shortcut to reopen a closed tab and "Ctrl+Shift+N" is the shortcut to reopen a closed window in the current session and if you have used "History -> Restore Previous Session" or otherwise restored the previous session. Firefox doesn't have a shortcut to reopen the previous session like Google Chrome might have according to what you write above. You will have to use the History menu if you want to use "Restore Previous Session".

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cor-el said

"Ctrl+Shift+N" is the shortcut to reopen a closed window in the current session

Thanks, the "in the current session" was what I suspected but didn't quite understand.

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