Search Support

Avoid support scams. We will never ask you to call or text a phone number or share personal information. Please report suspicious activity using the “Report Abuse” option.

Learn More

How to disable Firefox address bar in v83

  • 1 reply
  • 1 has this problem
  • 5 views
  • Last reply by jscher2000

more options

So I've recently updated to v83 and find out that that annoying address bar is back. I don't really want to use Chrome.css because I'm not good at programming or anything like that and I am afraid I might break my browser.

I have the solutions for v77 on my about:config and tried toggling them true/false and restarting my computer but I think Firefox "fixed" those workarounds.

Anybody have any new suggestions? Or am I stuck with this (I wouldn't mind it so much but it goes to it automatically when I open a new tab and that annoys me. I'm happy the history part of the workaround is still working cause I do NOT want anyone knowing my history. That's my business not theirs).

Chosen solution

There is a partial workaround, which takes advantage of the anti-animation setting. With that change, the bar won't enlarge until you start typing. To prevent ALL enlargement, or if you don't want to lose the animations, you do need to use style rules.

Partial Workaround

Here's how:

(1) In a new tab, type or paste about:config in the address bar and press Enter/Return. Click the button accepting the risk.

(2) In the search box in the page, type or paste the following new preference name

ui.prefersReducedMotion

If this preference was already created and shows a value of 0, skip to step (4).

(3) On the bar with the preference name, click the radio button next to Number and click the + button to add the preference. Then Firefox should display the new value.

(4) Set the value to 1 (double-click to edit if necessary) and click the blue checkmark button or press Enter to save the change.

Screenshot sequence for reference:


New userChrome.css file

You won't need to do any programming, but there are quite a few steps. I suggest allowing 10 minutes for this.

(A) Download a rules file

https://www.userchrome.org/samples/userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css

Use the downloads list on the toolbar to open the downloads folder directly to the new userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css file. (See attached screenshot)

Minimize that Windows File Explorer window for later reference.

(B) Create a new chrome folder in your profile folder

The following article has the detailed steps for that (#1, #2, and I recommend #3)

https://www.userchrome.org/how-create-userchrome-css.html

I have videos for both Windows and Mac in case the text is not clear.

(C) Move the userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css file you downloaded in Step A into the chrome folder you created in Step B

(D) If you do not already have a userChrome.css file, Rename the userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css file

Right-click userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css and choose Rename. Carefully remove -ZeroEnlargement and press Enter to save your change. The final file name needs to be userChrome.css or Firefox will never find it.

(E) Set Firefox to look for userChrome.css at startup -- see step #6 in the above article.

The next time you exit Firefox and start it up again, it should discover that file and apply the rules.

Success?

Once you start tweaking the interface this way, you'll probably find more and more things you want to do. I suggest bookmarking the pages where you get the code for future reference because changes to Firefox may break them and it's easier to request an update if you can find the source.

Read this answer in context 👍 0

All Replies (1)

more options

Chosen Solution

There is a partial workaround, which takes advantage of the anti-animation setting. With that change, the bar won't enlarge until you start typing. To prevent ALL enlargement, or if you don't want to lose the animations, you do need to use style rules.

Partial Workaround

Here's how:

(1) In a new tab, type or paste about:config in the address bar and press Enter/Return. Click the button accepting the risk.

(2) In the search box in the page, type or paste the following new preference name

ui.prefersReducedMotion

If this preference was already created and shows a value of 0, skip to step (4).

(3) On the bar with the preference name, click the radio button next to Number and click the + button to add the preference. Then Firefox should display the new value.

(4) Set the value to 1 (double-click to edit if necessary) and click the blue checkmark button or press Enter to save the change.

Screenshot sequence for reference:


New userChrome.css file

You won't need to do any programming, but there are quite a few steps. I suggest allowing 10 minutes for this.

(A) Download a rules file

https://www.userchrome.org/samples/userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css

Use the downloads list on the toolbar to open the downloads folder directly to the new userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css file. (See attached screenshot)

Minimize that Windows File Explorer window for later reference.

(B) Create a new chrome folder in your profile folder

The following article has the detailed steps for that (#1, #2, and I recommend #3)

https://www.userchrome.org/how-create-userchrome-css.html

I have videos for both Windows and Mac in case the text is not clear.

(C) Move the userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css file you downloaded in Step A into the chrome folder you created in Step B

(D) If you do not already have a userChrome.css file, Rename the userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css file

Right-click userChrome-ZeroEnlargement.css and choose Rename. Carefully remove -ZeroEnlargement and press Enter to save your change. The final file name needs to be userChrome.css or Firefox will never find it.

(E) Set Firefox to look for userChrome.css at startup -- see step #6 in the above article.

The next time you exit Firefox and start it up again, it should discover that file and apply the rules.

Success?

Once you start tweaking the interface this way, you'll probably find more and more things you want to do. I suggest bookmarking the pages where you get the code for future reference because changes to Firefox may break them and it's easier to request an update if you can find the source.

Helpful?

Ask a question

You must log in to your account to reply to posts. Please start a new question, if you do not have an account yet.