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Password not recognized by Godaddy

Posted

I recently got a new machine running Win10 Professional. I installed TBird (ver 60.5.2 32bit) with 3 accounts, all on Godaddy. I did use Mozbackup to migrate the contacts list.

All 3 are configured identically. For one, the password is not working. The message is: Login to server smtpout.secureserver.net with username sales@xxx.com failed

The password works when I login thru Godaddy. I have deleted and added the account.

Again ... the other two accounts are configured identically and work fine.

Ideas?

I recently got a new machine running Win10 Professional. I installed TBird (ver 60.5.2 32bit) with 3 accounts, all on Godaddy. I did use Mozbackup to migrate the contacts list. All 3 are configured identically. For one, the password is not working. The message is: Login to server smtpout.secureserver.net with username sales@xxx.com failed The password works when I login thru Godaddy. I have deleted and added the account. Again ... the other two accounts are configured identically and work fine. Ideas?

Chosen solution

In the old days, you sent mail with your lone ISP account on a desktop PC connected at all times to the ISP's network, through port 25 on an insecure connection. Today, we have many accounts and identities, accessed from several static and mobile devices, connecting over multiple networks in various locations. So, the need for secure authentication in everyday email - and that doesn't even mention encryption.

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  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64; rv:65.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/65.0

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sfhowes
  • Top 10 Contributor
1326 solutions 6269 answers

Helpful Reply

GoDaddy may require that the sending account uses the smtp server with the same User name/password. Open Tools/Account Settings, select an account in the left pane, then look at Outgoing Server in the lower right pane. Make sure each account is sending on the smtp server with the same User name/password (not all sending on the Default server). To make it easier, give each account and smtp server distinct names, e.g. godaddy1, godaddy2 etc.

GoDaddy may require that the sending account uses the smtp server with the same User name/password. Open Tools/Account Settings, select an account in the left pane, then look at Outgoing Server in the lower right pane. Make sure each account is sending on the smtp server with the same User name/password (not all sending on the Default server). To make it easier, give each account and smtp server distinct names, e.g. godaddy1, godaddy2 etc.
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Question owner

Thank you, prob solved. I do not understand why this is relevant after 10 years or so but I will not question the result.

You know, I believe that the elusive proof of the paranormal actually resides in personal computers.

Thank you, prob solved. I do not understand why this is relevant after 10 years or so but I will not question the result. You know, I believe that the elusive proof of the paranormal actually resides in personal computers.
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sfhowes
  • Top 10 Contributor
1326 solutions 6269 answers

Chosen Solution

In the old days, you sent mail with your lone ISP account on a desktop PC connected at all times to the ISP's network, through port 25 on an insecure connection. Today, we have many accounts and identities, accessed from several static and mobile devices, connecting over multiple networks in various locations. So, the need for secure authentication in everyday email - and that doesn't even mention encryption.

In the old days, you sent mail with your lone ISP account on a desktop PC connected at all times to the ISP's network, through port 25 on an insecure connection. Today, we have many accounts and identities, accessed from several static and mobile devices, connecting over multiple networks in various locations. So, the need for secure authentication in everyday email - and that doesn't even mention encryption.
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