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How can I move files or complete websites from Windows 7 to Nexus 7 for Firefox, without using sync?

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I'm writing documentation telling end users how to move large websites (up to 4GB, including PDFs but not sound or video) from Windows 7 to Nexus 7 (Android 4.2.2) to be used offline there -- preferably moving the site by a wired connection, instead of using Firefox sync. I have the latest Adobe plug-in, and the latest Java from Oracle, on the Nexus 7 (it would be nice if it were not necessary to download these after downloading the latest Firefox for the Nexus, but I suspect that's not Mozilla's fault).

So I saved a small test PDF file on the Nexus 7 (to see what download folder it got put into -- it showed up in sdcard/Download/). However, when I move a small PDF (that was NOT created on Nexus 7) from Windows to Nexus 7 (through the USB wire) to the same folder, the file does show up there as expected (as seen by ES File Explorer), but is invisible to Firefox.

Also there are several files left over in that folder from a previous installation of Firefox on the Nexus 7 (I uninstalled and re-installed Firefox, for a blank-slate test). I would also like to make these files visible in the new installation of Firefox, in order to delete them.

How can I instruct the end user to change permissions or whatever on the Nexus 7, or otherwise cause certain PDF or HTML files in the sdcard/Download/ folder to also be visible to Firefox?

I'm writing documentation telling end users how to move large websites (up to 4GB, including PDFs but not sound or video) from Windows 7 to Nexus 7 (Android 4.2.2) to be used offline there -- preferably moving the site by a wired connection, instead of using Firefox sync. I have the latest Adobe plug-in, and the latest Java from Oracle, on the Nexus 7 (it would be nice if it were not necessary to download these after downloading the latest Firefox for the Nexus, but I suspect that's not Mozilla's fault). So I saved a small test PDF file on the Nexus 7 (to see what download folder it got put into -- it showed up in sdcard/Download/). However, when I move a small PDF (that was NOT created on Nexus 7) from Windows to Nexus 7 (through the USB wire) to the same folder, the file does show up there as expected (as seen by ES File Explorer), but is invisible to Firefox. Also there are several files left over in that folder from a previous installation of Firefox on the Nexus 7 (I uninstalled and re-installed Firefox, for a blank-slate test). I would also like to make these files visible in the new installation of Firefox, in order to delete them. How can I instruct the end user to change permissions or whatever on the Nexus 7, or otherwise cause certain PDF or HTML files in the sdcard/Download/ folder to also be visible to Firefox?

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  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0

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Andrew
  • Moderator
277 solutions 3569 answers

Helpful Reply

The best way to do things is to use sync. If you wish do use other methods it would become complicated.

The best way to do things is to use sync. If you wish do use other methods it would become complicated.
kbrosnan
  • Top 25 Contributor
  • Moderator
389 solutions 2751 answers

Helpful Reply

What you are trying to do makes no sense to me.

There is no Oracle Java for Android. Adobe stopped supporting Flash Player on Android 4.1 and higher.

Firefox Sync provides URLs in the form of history and bookmarks. Content of the pages is not synced.

Files on the system can be browsed using the file:/// protocol. Though using it as a way to view cached sites is almost certain to fail due to security restrictions. Only the simplest sites are likely to work in this manner.

What you are trying to do makes no sense to me. There is no Oracle Java for Android. Adobe stopped supporting Flash Player on Android 4.1 and higher. Firefox Sync provides URLs in the form of history and bookmarks. Content of the pages is not synced. Files on the system can be browsed using the file:/// protocol. Though using it as a way to view cached sites is almost certain to fail due to security restrictions. Only the simplest sites are likely to work in this manner.

Question owner

Thanks, this helps me understand the difficulties I've had.

Clearly the industry needs to think and work more toward making online and offline work together better for the user. The new mini pads are ideal for use in the field, and workers need to be able to do their jobs even when connections are lost temporarily.

I'm working on ways for people to have disaster survival and recovery information, even when electricity and Internet are totally down (as happened to thousands during the recent Hurricane Sandy). Provide offline access to maps, evacuation routes, how to find and purify water, emergency medicine, working with national and local relief efforts, lessons from past disasters -- using devices that hold gigabytes of information, are self-contained, easily portable, not fragile, consume little power for easy manual, solar, other telephone-style recharging, are usable even in total darkness, and can copy websites so that existing information does not need to be reformatted unnecessarily. This is essential, and the bad job now being done to provide this information is (and should be recognized as) a serious security issue.

I'm looking at Dropbox. The current Android version lets you mark files as favorites, causing them to be downloaded for offline use. And this project doesn't need video for now.

Thanks, this helps me understand the difficulties I've had. Clearly the industry needs to think and work more toward making online and offline work together better for the user. The new mini pads are ideal for use in the field, and workers need to be able to do their jobs even when connections are lost temporarily. I'm working on ways for people to have disaster survival and recovery information, even when electricity and Internet are totally down (as happened to thousands during the recent Hurricane Sandy). Provide offline access to maps, evacuation routes, how to find and purify water, emergency medicine, working with national and local relief efforts, lessons from past disasters -- using devices that hold gigabytes of information, are self-contained, easily portable, not fragile, consume little power for easy manual, solar, other telephone-style recharging, are usable even in total darkness, and can copy websites so that existing information does not need to be reformatted unnecessarily. This is essential, and the bad job now being done to provide this information is (and should be recognized as) a serious security issue. I'm looking at Dropbox. The current Android version lets you mark files as favorites, causing them to be downloaded for offline use. And this project doesn't need video for now.