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What does the phrase 'got your back' mean, please ?

Posted

You urge me to:

"Now get the mobile browser that’s got your back"

Could someone kindly explain what this phrase means, if anything (it does not appear in Urban Dictionary nor American Heritage 2006), though I would guess it is a US usage. Many thanks

You urge me to: "Now get the mobile browser that’s got your back" Could someone kindly explain what this phrase means, if anything (it does not appear in Urban Dictionary nor American Heritage 2006), though I would guess it is a US usage. Many thanks

Chosen solution

'We've got your back', is an idiom. It's pretty much the the same as "I've got your 6 o'clock", another idiom. It essentially is referring to the idea that when one is in a precarious situation that one can't easily watch out for everything. A person saying they have your back means they are there to help you out, they will watch out and take care of the things you're likely to miss, that they are a second set of eyes and hands for you; for Firefox this likely means things dealing with security, unwanted popups, and malicious things that happen on the internet that Firefox can protect you from.

Read this answer in context 2

Additional System Details

This happened

Every time Firefox opened

Installed Plug-ins

Several, e.g. Noscript, but I doubt if they are relevant

Application

  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; rv:15.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/15.0.1

More Information

ideato 893 solutions 6250 answers

Helpful Reply

Hi ardj

i did not find neither in dictionaries, answer from an old american friend :

"it is something reliable and it won't let you down"


thank you

Hi ardj i did not find neither in dictionaries, answer from an old american friend : "it is something reliable and it won't let you down" thank you
AaronMT 44 solutions 299 answers

Chosen Solution

'We've got your back', is an idiom. It's pretty much the the same as "I've got your 6 o'clock", another idiom. It essentially is referring to the idea that when one is in a precarious situation that one can't easily watch out for everything. A person saying they have your back means they are there to help you out, they will watch out and take care of the things you're likely to miss, that they are a second set of eyes and hands for you; for Firefox this likely means things dealing with security, unwanted popups, and malicious things that happen on the internet that Firefox can protect you from.

'We've got your back', is an idiom. It's pretty much the the same as "I've got your 6 o'clock", another idiom. It essentially is referring to the idea that when one is in a precarious situation that one can't easily watch out for everything. A person saying they have your back means they are there to help you out, they will watch out and take care of the things you're likely to miss, that they are a second set of eyes and hands for you; for Firefox this likely means things dealing with security, unwanted popups, and malicious things that happen on the internet that Firefox can protect you from.
mluna 70 solutions 486 answers

Hi,

I sent your feedback to a person I know in Marketing, so thanks for mentioning that the meaning is not obvious outside of the states.

Ideato is correct, and I would add that this is something friends will say to one another to reassure them that they have help, they will say 'I've got your back' as a way of letting someone know that they have someone behind them to support them and fight with them if needed.

So, the image is that you are staring down a dangerous internet, full of viruses and malware, but you aren't worried because Firefox has your back! We're your supportive friends, always at your side, protecting you on the web. Really, we are, you have no idea how we are fighting back the bad stuff day and night, so you can be safe on the web.

If I may ask, how would you phrase this in your native language?

Best, Michelle

Hi, I sent your feedback to a person I know in Marketing, so thanks for mentioning that the meaning is not obvious outside of the states. Ideato is correct, and I would add that this is something friends will say to one another to reassure them that they have help, they will say 'I've got your back' as a way of letting someone know that they have someone behind them to support them and fight with them if needed. So, the image is that you are staring down a dangerous internet, full of viruses and malware, but you aren't worried because Firefox has your back! We're your supportive friends, always at your side, protecting you on the web. Really, we are, you have no idea how we are fighting back the bad stuff day and night, so you can be safe on the web. If I may ask, how would you phrase this in your native language? Best, Michelle
the-edmeister
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5395 solutions 40094 answers
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=got+your+back
mluna 70 solutions 486 answers

Ah Ed! You are the definition of 'got+your+back' on Mozilla Support! I expected to see a picture of you there :) Happy Friday to you all.

-M

Ah Ed! You are the definition of 'got+your+back' on Mozilla Support! I expected to see a picture of you there :) Happy Friday to you all. -M
kreemoweet 0 solutions 6 answers

Does Mozilla really think it appropriate to be using street slang on those high-visibility pages? As an older U.S. resident and user of Standard English, I have heard the phrase in question, but had no clear idea of what it might mean.

Does Mozilla really think it appropriate to be using street slang on those high-visibility pages? As an older U.S. resident and user of Standard English, I have heard the phrase in question, but had no clear idea of what it might mean.

Question owner

Thanks everybody - now you tell me, it does ring a faint bell - and particular thanks to the edmeister for pointing out that I have not yet learned to use a dictionary properly (can't think how I missed it, mutter, mutter) - good to have you lot at my back. To mluna: Michelle, I think 'we're all behind you on this' or 'we are on your side/at your side' or 'we'll watch out for you' would be normal UK English - or, I suspect, US. (And of course not to be confused with 'on my back' which refers to a continual nuisance, like the boss chasing you or 'getting someone's back up' which means to annoy them.) Alas, I cannot think off-hand of any slang equivalents but if anything occurs to me ...

Thanks everybody - now you tell me, it does ring a faint bell - and particular thanks to the edmeister for pointing out that I have not yet learned to use a dictionary properly (can't think how I missed it, mutter, mutter) - good to have you lot at my back. To mluna: Michelle, I think 'we're all behind you on this' or 'we are on your side/at your side' or 'we'll watch out for you' would be normal UK English - or, I suspect, US. (And of course not to be confused with 'on my back' which refers to a continual nuisance, like the boss chasing you or 'getting someone's back up' which means to annoy them.) Alas, I cannot think off-hand of any slang equivalents but if anything occurs to me ...