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How does one turn off 'Deceptive Site' blocking?

  • 11 replies
  • 2 have this problem
  • 1333 views
  • Last reply by Electrojim

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Every now and then, I get the 'Firefox Red Screen of Caution' about the site I'm attempting to visit. It's shown as a Deceptive Site, and I'm urged to NOT visit it. One option open to me is to 'Ignore Warning' and proceed. This works most of the time, but occasionally even clicking that option does not allow me to bypass Firefox's well-intentioned blockade and have to use an alternative browser. How do I deal with this otherwise?

Every now and then, I get the 'Firefox Red Screen of Caution' about the site I'm attempting to visit. It's shown as a Deceptive Site, and I'm urged to NOT visit it. One option open to me is to 'Ignore Warning' and proceed. This works most of the time, but occasionally even clicking that option does not allow me to bypass Firefox's well-intentioned blockade and have to use an alternative browser. How do I deal with this otherwise?

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Thanks for all the tips, guys. I just tried the whole thing again this morning, and it's working as it should. I can go to that first deceptive page, ignore the warning, get transferred to the second deceptive page, and now can ignore that one's warning too and wind-up on that bogus PayPal site. Once on the PayPal(ha!) page, I can log in with a very rude username and password, which is recorded somewhere, I'm sure, at which point I am redirected to the real PayPal site.

This is typical of all manner of notifications I get that my Office 365 mailbox is full, or corrupted or whatever, which is odd because I don't have an Office 365 account. But I go ahead and log in anyway, again using disparaging phrases in the username and password fields. These always then redirect to a legitimate Microsoft login page, but I still wouldn't use it.

Anyway, just rattling the scammers' cages, all in good fun. I do remain vigilant everywhere I go, comparing the address in the browser address bar with where I think I should be. Now if you'll excuse me, I need to collect my 25% share of the $55 million that the widow of the Ghana oil minister is sending me... as soon as I pay the $330 transportation charge.

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All Replies (11)

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When Ignore Warning doesn't work, what do you see next after you click that?

This is the related help article: How does built-in Phishing and Malware Protection work?

P.S. Your Flash plugin is out of date. See: Flash Plugin - Keep it up to date and troubleshoot problems.

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Thanks for the reply, jsher. In answer to your question, the attached screenshots, Snap 2, Snap 3 and Snap 4 show what happens, in that order. Once that final screen shows, there's nothing I can do to proceed to the site. I can close the page and start over, but I get the same thing. Internet Explorer does not give me any security warning at all, just goes to the site. (As far as I'm concerned, that's the only thing it's good for.)

Modified by Electrojim

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I know what you want to do but as a moral thing should we be helping you to get hacked or what ever lies beyond the Google info ?

Is this something you should be asking a non-profit company to supply you with the information to allow yourself to have intrusion, code injection, backdoors and miners infect your system which in turn effects all other users including your friends and family and the world.

Sorry, no info from me to help you


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Well, Pkshadow, that's an interesting response from an ethics standpoint. But is it really a browser's duty to act not only as a policeman, but as judge and jury as well? To collect and compile data on known-nefarious URLs is commendable; to warn and to protect is one thing, and even standing in the way to ask, "Are you sure," is comforting. But to deny access to a legitimate, working Website, whether it good-intentioned or not, sounds like censorship to me. And that is not what the Internet is all about... right?

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Hi, that is correct. Why not follow the path way that web site owners and even the browsing public can do is report the site as clean as is false /positive. Notify the owner of said site since it looses traffic and possibly money because of the block.

The above is what people do.

I am bewildered as the above is the standard response to the issue as you have described it, not going after the browser that uses a 3rd party list even if is the competitors to try to keep people safe.

Anybody can report to Google since that is the Big Red Screen a false/positive but it will not get removed until the indexed issue (Which you can look at ) is resolved.

This is like not the normal issue of this Red Screen your asking for . So it is not normal and solution is not readily available.

Have you run the URL's by chance through : https://www.virustotal.com/#/home/url or the other 2 options.

I go to Bittorrent sites all the time if that is the issue. there are ways around it other than what your suggesting is a solution.

Bitport.io is a solution with Right Click Copy/Paste, iGetter to download via HTTPS

Note, that Malwarebytes puts up the same blocks.

There is nothing hard about a working around this......

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If you want to disable Google Safe Browsing (NOT recommended of course) :

Type in the address bar about:config and press Enter (promise to be careful, if asked)

Type in the search bar :

browser.safebrowsing.phishing.enabled

Set its value to false

Type in the search bar :

browser.safebrowsing.malware.enabled

Set its value to false

Then close and restart Firefox.

More information about Safe Browsing and a list of all preferences on the "about:config" page :

https://wiki.mozilla.org/Security/Safe_Browsing

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So what you're showing in the 3rd video after ignoring the warning is that you get transferred to a different "Deceptive Site" where the same warning appears.

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Thanks, all. Believe me, I do appreciate the safety aspect that a browser's Safe Browsing and, of course, all the antivirus efforts bring to Websurfing; it's certainly not my intention to downplay the importance of these utilities for the computing world at-large. I simply wanted a workaround for the built-in safety measure, and McCoy's instructions have given a means, albeit not an instant 'radio-button' sort of answer. But certainly a solution I can live with.

In answer to the-ed's comment, I do see what you mean, that the third screenshot does show a handoff to yet another deceptive site. But this time Firefox did not present an option to 'ignore' the warning and press on. Unlike the second shot, clicking: See Details on that third screen did nothing. It's as if that button is somehow defeated by the redirect, which was the crux of my original complaint. If I'd been able on the third screen to click: See Details and then click: ignore the risk and pass on through, that would have been fine. But that third screen did not respond to the button at all.

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Electrojim said

See Details on that third screen did nothing. It's as if that button is somehow defeated by the redirect, which was the crux of my original complaint. If I'd been able on the third screen to click: See Details and then click: ignore the risk and pass on through, that would have been fine. But that third screen did not respond to the button at all.

Out of curiosity I tried "See Details" and it worked.

Then I typed the URL in the address bar and left out "includes/db/title/" and I got no Deceptive Site warning ......

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The website just redirects to another website that is blocked by phishing protection, so you would have to repeat this another time if you are willing to take the risk (I end up on a page with a Paypal login screen, so there is money involved - be warned).

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Chosen Solution

Thanks for all the tips, guys. I just tried the whole thing again this morning, and it's working as it should. I can go to that first deceptive page, ignore the warning, get transferred to the second deceptive page, and now can ignore that one's warning too and wind-up on that bogus PayPal site. Once on the PayPal(ha!) page, I can log in with a very rude username and password, which is recorded somewhere, I'm sure, at which point I am redirected to the real PayPal site.

This is typical of all manner of notifications I get that my Office 365 mailbox is full, or corrupted or whatever, which is odd because I don't have an Office 365 account. But I go ahead and log in anyway, again using disparaging phrases in the username and password fields. These always then redirect to a legitimate Microsoft login page, but I still wouldn't use it.

Anyway, just rattling the scammers' cages, all in good fun. I do remain vigilant everywhere I go, comparing the address in the browser address bar with where I think I should be. Now if you'll excuse me, I need to collect my 25% share of the $55 million that the widow of the Ghana oil minister is sending me... as soon as I pay the $330 transportation charge.