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Will allowing a Firefox "Refresh" create a restore point so that computer may be later restored to that point to view email account open at time of "Refresh'?

Kuphostiwe

I went to an institution computer lab/3-D printing site in regard to printing (manufacturing) my patented product. During the interview I had to resort to my email about scheduling details and a pop up to "Refresh" Firefox came up. Being somewhat tired I allowed it. And being partly blind I failed to notice that my Yahoo email had the " Say signed in" in their default "Go" position. I signed out of my email but when I reopened the computer several minutes later,I noticed all my emails were there for anyone to read. Since this involved a patent situation, where IP stealing is always a problem, this was a concern. I logged out and was able to closed the email access only 10 or 20 minutes after the initial breach. But I wonder if the Firefox "Refresh" created a restore point so that a person with administrative authority on the computer could do a system restore to the point of Firefox "Refresh" and gain access to all my sensitive emails. Unfortunately the Yahoo default "stay signed in" often tends to put the user in rape- ready position. Subsequent refreshes or restarts may inadvertently leave the front door open for hacking of all your emails involving lawyers, accountants, mistresses, political improprieties etc.

I went to an institution computer lab/3-D printing site in regard to printing (manufacturing) my patented product. During the interview I had to resort to my email about scheduling details and a pop up to "Refresh" Firefox came up. Being somewhat tired I allowed it. And being partly blind I failed to notice that my Yahoo email had the " Say signed in" in their default "Go" position. I signed out of my email but when I reopened the computer several minutes later,I noticed all my emails were there for anyone to read. Since this involved a patent situation, where IP stealing is always a problem, this was a concern. I logged out and was able to closed the email access only 10 or 20 minutes after the initial breach. But I wonder if the Firefox "Refresh" created a restore point so that a person with administrative authority on the computer could do a system restore to the point of Firefox "Refresh" and gain access to all my sensitive emails. Unfortunately the Yahoo default "stay signed in" often tends to put the user in rape- ready position. Subsequent refreshes or restarts may inadvertently leave the front door open for hacking of all your emails involving lawyers, accountants, mistresses, political improprieties etc.
Isicaphuno

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  • I-ejenti Engumsebenzisi: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64; rv:68.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/68.0

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jscher2000
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Kuphostiwe

Hi dan.arnow, have you already changed your Yahoo password to avoid issues that could be caused by third parties having access to session cookies or tokens?

Are you saying you were using someone else's computer at the time this happened, or was it your computer that you had with you?

A Firefox Refresh moves your entire profile folder to the computer Desktop in a folder named Old Firefox Data. This would include saved logins, current cookies, and history of visited URLs. However, cached files -- page content -- is not preserved in a Refresh so the actual list of what was in your Inbox would not be in that folder.

Firefox's session history feature -- used for crash recovery -- stores session cookies so you can be restored as well as possible to the point of the crash. This is also used for the "Restore Previous Session" feature when you start after Firefox shut down normally (not after a crash). The best way to avoid third party access to accounts is to always log out and not save your login in any password manager. If Yahoo allows access despite those things, there is something very wrong with Yahoo's site.

Hi dan.arnow, have you already changed your Yahoo password to avoid issues that could be caused by third parties having access to session cookies or tokens? Are you saying you were using someone else's computer at the time this happened, or was it your computer that you had with you? A Firefox Refresh moves your entire profile folder to the computer Desktop in a folder named '''Old Firefox Data'''. This would include saved logins, current cookies, and history of visited URLs. However, cached files -- page content -- is not preserved in a Refresh so the actual list of what was in your Inbox would not be in that folder. Firefox's session history feature -- used for crash recovery -- stores session cookies so you can be restored as well as possible to the point of the crash. This is also used for the "Restore Previous Session" feature when you start after Firefox shut down normally (not after a crash). The best way to avoid third party access to accounts is to always log out and not save your login in any password manager. ''If Yahoo allows access despite those things, there is something very wrong with Yahoo's site.''
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Isicaphuno
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