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Amazon allowed to change my password in Firefox?

  • 6 uphendule
  • 2 zinale nkinga
  • 12 views
  • Igcine ukuphendulwa ngu jonzn4SUSE

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On four occasions during the past three months, Amazon has refused my log in to their site, stating that I've not used the correct password. When this occurs, I look at my 'password box' and can see that the number of characters (the black dots) are of a far greater number than the number of characters in my current password by more than 200. When I go to 'Security' in Firefox to view my password, it has indeed changed to a random selection of 200 plus characters. When I erase these characters and retype my original password, Amazon will accept the change and I can log in.

My question: Although I don't expect anyone to know why Amazon is doing this, I'm baffled as to how Firefox can be manipulated by Amazon so as to change my password.

Has anyone experienced this and is there any advice? I'm hopeful that an actual Amazon tech will have a response to this as well as the community.

Thank you,

Placerville

All Replies (6)

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I noticed the same issue a few days ago. Just a long string of random characters.

Okulungisiwe ngu jonzn4SUSE

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Some websites use JavaScript to modify the password field and possibly copy the password to another hidden field. If Firefox detects that the password has been modified the Firefox will offer to update the password. You can create a login block exception for this website (origin) with the proper protocol (usually https://) via Options/Preferences to prevent Firefox from updating the password.

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Thank you for this reply. I'm having a bit of difficulty with what you've written as I'm not a proficient as yourself.

You advised that I, "can create a login block exception for this website (origin) with the proper protocol (usually https://) via Options/Preferences to prevent Firefox from updating the password."

By this, am I correct that you are advising to making these changes in Firefox? If so, when I select Tools/Options (in Firefox), I'm unable to locate a 'Preferences' for this change. Could you direct me?

I read through the link you provided, but I was unable to find anything that addressed this issue.

Thank you for your assistance.

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cor-el said

Some websites use JavaScript to modify the password field and possibly copy the password to another hidden field. If Firefox detects that the password has been modified the Firefox will offer to update the password. You can create a login block exception for this website (origin) with the proper protocol (usually https://) via Options/Preferences to prevent Firefox from updating the password.

The issue is why Firefox allowed a website to change our password. Sounds strange to me, but this is a better option. I just set this in my browser because my Amazon password was changed and it shocked me!

Use a Primary Password to protect stored logins and passwords https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/use-primary-password-protect-stored-logins

Okulungisiwe ngu jonzn4SUSE

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jonzn4SUSE,

Thank you. Your comment, "The issue is why Firefox allowed a website to change our password" is spot on and exactly why I posted this.

I hope that Firefox is reading this thread and will either respond or take the appropriate corrective action. Out of all of the sites I visit that are password protected, this only happens when I log in to Amazon (and it has happened twice again since my original post).

Thank you for the referral to Primary Password. I think at this time I'll remain status quo to see how (or if) this is addressed.

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Just happened again today. I couldn't get into Amazon on my computer. I went to see what password Firefox has for the site and it is another random string which doesn't work because I didn't set it.

Current password in Firefox - 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

Right, what the hell is that and how is it changing?!?!?! ;-)) The only thing I did recently was switch to version 84 on Linux. The Amazon app on my phone works just fine.