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trying to upgrade, downloaded ff, extracted into a folder, now what

Kuphostiwe

I am not very good at computers but running Linux anyway.... Needed to upgrade web browser, so tried to follow the directions but got stuck. How do I make the computer use the new download instead of it just sitting there in the folder?

I am not very good at computers but running Linux anyway.... Needed to upgrade web browser, so tried to follow the directions but got stuck. How do I make the computer use the new download instead of it just sitting there in the folder?

Eminye Imininingwane Yohlelo

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  • The Adobe Reader plugin is used to enable viewing of PDF and FDF files from within the browser.
  • Shockwave Flash 11.2 r202
  • The IcedTea-Web Plugin executes Java applets.
  • This plug-in detects the presence of iTunes when opening iTunes Store URLs in a web page with Firefox.
  • The Totem 2.30.2 plugin handles video and audio streams.
  • DivX Web Player version 1.4.0.233
  • Shockwave Flash 10.1 r999. Gnash 0.8.7, the GNU SWF Player. Copyright (C) 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc. Gnash comes with NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law. You may redistribute copies of Gnash under the terms of the GNU General Public License. For more information about Gnash, see http://www.gnu.org/software/gnash. Compatible Shockwave Flash 10.1 r999.

Isisebenziso

  • I-ejenti Engumsebenzisi: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Ubuntu; Linux x86_64; rv:20.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/20.0

Eminye Imininingwane

Tyler Downer
  • Top 25 Contributor
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1530 izisombululo 10669 izimpendulo
Kuphostiwe

Follow the directions at Install Firefox on Linux

Just a word of advice, if you aren't familiar with computers, Linux probably isn't the best bet. I'd suggest either reading some books on it, or switching to windows or Mac

Follow the directions at [[Install Firefox on Linux]] Just a word of advice, if you aren't familiar with computers, Linux probably isn't the best bet. I'd suggest either reading some books on it, or switching to windows or Mac
cor-el
  • Top 10 Contributor
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17481 izisombululo 157964 izimpendulo
Kuphostiwe

Verify that you meet the System Requirements (GTK+ and GLib) for the current Firefox version.

Verify that you meet the System Requirements (GTK+ and GLib) for the current Firefox version. *https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/40.0.3/system-requirements/

Umnikazi wombuzo

I have been trying to follow the directions, but it says:

"To start Firefox, run the firefox script in the firefox folder: ~/firefox/firefox"

When I look thru the folder that I downloaded I am not seeing anything like that and nothing that looks like it could be "run" such as an exe file.

I have been running Linux for 15 years without being a computer person. It can be tough to work with, but I don't like Microsoft or Apple. Unfortunately my kids don't use it. Well, thanks for trying. Looks like I may have to get a Linux geek to marry into the family...

I have been trying to follow the directions, but it says: "To start Firefox, run the firefox script in the firefox folder: ~/firefox/firefox" When I look thru the folder that I downloaded I am not seeing anything like that and nothing that looks like it could be "run" such as an exe file. I have been running Linux for 15 years without being a computer person. It can be tough to work with, but I don't like Microsoft or Apple. Unfortunately my kids don't use it. Well, thanks for trying. Looks like I may have to get a Linux geek to marry into the family...
cor-el
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17481 izisombululo 157964 izimpendulo
Kuphostiwe

Did you extract all the files in the Firefox tar.bz2 archive to a folder?

You can install Firefox in a location that requires root access or you can install Firefox in a folder in the home directory. In case of the latter you can only run Firefox as that single user.

On Linux you set an "is executable" attribute to a file (script) to be able to run the script. A file manager usually shows this as an 'x' (rwx or rx). There is not the concept of a special file extension like .exe (or .com) for executable files and .cmd or .bat for script files on Windows.

Did you extract all the files in the Firefox tar.bz2 archive to a folder? You can install Firefox in a location that requires root access or you can install Firefox in a folder in the home directory. In case of the latter you can only run Firefox as that single user. *http://kb.mozillazine.org/Installing_Firefox#Linux On Linux you set an "is executable" attribute to a file (script) to be able to run the script. A file manager usually shows this as an 'x' (rwx or rx). There is not the concept of a special file extension like .exe (or .com) for executable files and .cmd or .bat for script files on Windows.
fruitklah 0 izisombululo 18 izimpendulo
Kuphostiwe

If you're not very good with computers in general, you made the error of trying to install firefox like if in Windows.

Use your Applications Manager, it's like a store where all applications are, you type in Firefox, it will find the newest version, you click on it and press OK to install, and that's it.

My mom finds Linux Mint Mate easier to deal with than Windows, so it's not that bad an idea for novices to use Linux, just a user friendly distro is good enough to make things easier.

When you download a folder like that, it's to compile a program directly, from a "tarball", that's what people calls these compressed files that you extracted. Very unneeded when it comes to FF.

If you're not very good with computers in general, you made the error of trying to install firefox like if in Windows. Use your Applications Manager, it's like a store where all applications are, you type in Firefox, it will find the newest version, you click on it and press OK to install, and that's it. My mom finds Linux Mint Mate easier to deal with than Windows, so it's not that bad an idea for novices to use Linux, just a user friendly distro is good enough to make things easier. When you download a folder like that, it's to compile a program directly, from a "tarball", that's what people calls these compressed files that you extracted. Very unneeded when it comes to FF.
cor-el
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17481 izisombululo 157964 izimpendulo
Kuphostiwe

The tar.bz2 archive contains all compiled files that you nee to run Firefox. You only have to extract the files to a folder and create a launcher to start the firefox script from that folder. Easiest to do that is to use a file manager. You can usually open the archive with the cursor Right key. If you have a dual pane file manager then you can open the destination folder in the other pane and copy all files and folder to the other pane. Otherwise you can open a second instance of the file manager. This way it only takes a few seconds to install Firefox and you do not need to enter commands in a terminal window.

The tar.bz2 archive contains all compiled files that you nee to run Firefox. You only have to extract the files to a folder and create a launcher to start the firefox script from that folder. Easiest to do that is to use a file manager. You can usually open the archive with the cursor Right key. If you have a dual pane file manager then you can open the destination folder in the other pane and copy all files and folder to the other pane. Otherwise you can open a second instance of the file manager. This way it only takes a few seconds to install Firefox and you do not need to enter commands in a terminal window.
James
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1596 izisombululo 11250 izimpendulo
Kuphostiwe

fruitklah said

Use your Applications Manager, it's like a store where all applications are, you type in Firefox, it will find the newest version, you click on it and press OK to install, and that's it. When you download a folder like that, it's to compile a program directly, from a "tarball", that's what people calls these compressed files that you extracted. Very unneeded when it comes to FF.

Installing Firefox through the Linux distro Package Manager is only effective if you are using a current enough version of distro that still gets packages updates (by way of say. rpm or .deb) from them.

I take you have never used Firefox for Linux from www.mozilla.org or www.mozilla.org/firefox/all

The only reason why you would compile Firefox is if you were doing it from source.

Just download the firefox tar.bz2, extract (or untar if in terminal) and then run the firefox script file in Firefox folder is the basics. The only thing it does not do is make any shortcuts to firefox script anywhere as you have to manually make launchers where you want on desktop or panel or menu etc.

''fruitklah [[#answer-783367|said]]'' <blockquote> Use your Applications Manager, it's like a store where all applications are, you type in Firefox, it will find the newest version, you click on it and press OK to install, and that's it. When you download a folder like that, it's to compile a program directly, from a "tarball", that's what people calls these compressed files that you extracted. Very unneeded when it comes to FF. </blockquote> Installing Firefox through the Linux distro Package Manager is only effective if you are using a current enough version of distro that still gets packages updates (by way of say. rpm or .deb) from them. I take you have never used Firefox for Linux from www.mozilla.org or www.mozilla.org/firefox/all The only reason why you would compile Firefox is if you were doing it from source. Just download the firefox tar.bz2, extract (or untar if in terminal) and then run the firefox script file in Firefox folder is the basics. The only thing it does not do is make any shortcuts to firefox script anywhere as you have to manually make launchers where you want on desktop or panel or menu etc.

Okulungisiwe ngu James

James
  • Moderator
1596 izisombululo 11250 izimpendulo
Kuphostiwe

scor said

When I look thru the folder that I downloaded I am not seeing anything like that and nothing that looks like it could be "run" such as an exe file. I have been running Linux for 15 years without being a computer person.

So you were relaying only on the package manager in whatever Linux distros you were using over the years to install new software?. Sure now days it tends to be much more GUI in doing things. So you never learned the basics of setting up a application on Linux that came as a tarball and not .rpm or .deb over some 15 years?

You seem to have Ubuntu and the old Firefox 20.0 version. The Firefox 20.0 version is what the old Ubuntu 13.04 distro (released April 25, 2013) came with if you did not do any Firefox package updates since.

Ubuntu tends to support the more current and the supported LTS versions so there may not be any Firefox package updates for 13.04 from them.

http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=ubuntu

''scor [[#answer-782294|said]]'' <blockquote> When I look thru the folder that I downloaded I am not seeing anything like that and nothing that looks like it could be "run" such as an exe file. I have been running Linux for 15 years without being a computer person. </blockquote> So you were relaying only on the package manager in whatever Linux distros you were using over the years to install new software?. Sure now days it tends to be much more GUI in doing things. So you never learned the basics of setting up a application on Linux that came as a tarball and not .rpm or .deb over some 15 years? You seem to have Ubuntu and the old Firefox 20.0 version. The Firefox 20.0 version is what the old Ubuntu 13.04 distro (released April 25, 2013) came with if you did not do any Firefox package updates since. Ubuntu tends to support the more current and the supported LTS versions so there may not be any Firefox package updates for 13.04 from them. http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=ubuntu

Okulungisiwe ngu James