X
Nhấn vào đây để đến phiên bản di động của trang web.

Diễn đàn trợ giúp

How do I stop News websites from re-loading constantly?

Được đăng

Several months ago, the news websites started re-loading their home page. This is very annoying, as when it comes back, it doesn't return to where you were reading. As a result, a lot of scrolling is needed to go back and continue. I've contacted them, without a relevant reply. (Clear your cache) Is there a way to stop the auto-reload through the Firefox settings? (Using Win 10 & XP).

Several months ago, the news websites started re-loading their home page. This is very annoying, as when it comes back, it doesn't return to where you were reading. As a result, a lot of scrolling is needed to go back and continue. I've contacted them, without a relevant reply. (Clear your cache) Is there a way to stop the auto-reload through the Firefox settings? (Using Win 10 & XP).

Chi tiết hệ thống bổ sung

Phần bổ trợ đã cài đặt

  • 5.1.40728.0
  • Citrix Online App Detector Plugin
  • Shockwave Flash 14.0 r0
  • Next Generation Java Plug-in 10.40.2 for Mozilla browsers
  • NPRuntime Script Plug-in Library for Java(TM) Deploy
  • Nitro PDF plugin for Firefox and Chrome
  • Adobe PDF Plug-In For Firefox and Netscape 8.3.1
  • Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) plug-in for Mozilla browsers
  • Npdsplay dll

Ứng dụng

  • Chuỗi đại diện người dùng: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 5.1; rv:33.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/33.0

Thông tin chi tiết

Wesley Branton
  • Top 10 Contributor
612 giải pháp 5117 câu trả lời
Được đăng

This doesn't sound like regular Firefox behavior and might be an issue on the website's end.

Can you please post a link to a page that you experience this issue on?

This doesn't sound like regular Firefox behavior and might be an issue on the website's end. Can you please post a link to a page that you experience this issue on?
the-edmeister
  • Top 25 Contributor
  • Moderator
5406 giải pháp 40221 câu trả lời
Được đăng

When you click to open a news article from the main headlines page, open it in a Tab (middle-click, ctrl & click, or right-click & open in tab) so that when you are done reading the article you can close the tab and resume where you left off reading on the main page. Many news websites have "no cache" coding in thew web pages so that the web browser reloads a page from the server rather than loading the page you just left and want to "go back" to.

Also, many news sites load a partial page of article listings, and when you scroll down like 3/4 of the original "load" more articles get loaded and make the page longer. Doing it that way allows the initial page loading time to be faster (less info is loaded) and it allows the website to change the advertisements or add some.

I have also seen some, like the Chicago Tribune and LA Times websites, where while I am reading an article in a Tab, the main page reloads and it at the top again; with different advertisements. That seems to happen when the main page is scrolled to near the bottom.

Both are less distracting methods of changing out advertisements than "rotating" ads in a stationary right-hand column or having the ads change when a viewer scrolls down to see the next batch of articles.

When you click to open a news article from the main headlines page, open it in a Tab ''(middle-click, ctrl & click, or right-click & open in tab)'' so that when you are done reading the article you can close the tab and resume where you left off reading on the main page. Many news websites have "no cache" coding in thew web pages so that the web browser reloads a page from the server rather than loading the page you just left and want to "go back" to. Also, many news sites load a partial page of article listings, and when you scroll down like 3/4 of the original "load" more articles get loaded and make the page longer. Doing it that way allows the initial page loading time to be faster (less info is loaded) and it allows the website to change the advertisements or add some. I have also seen some, like the Chicago Tribune and LA Times websites, where while I am reading an article in a Tab, the main page reloads and it at the top again; with different advertisements. That seems to happen when the main page is scrolled to near the bottom. Both are less distracting methods of changing out advertisements than "rotating" ads in a stationary right-hand column or having the ads change when a viewer scrolls down to see the next batch of articles.