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Firefox for Android, Firefox for iOS, Firefox Focus and Firefox Klar collect data about installations and retention using a third-party tracking framework called adjust. This helps Mozilla determine the origin of the installation by answering the question, "Did this user on this
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  Use the private tab in Firefox for Android to visit web pages without saving your history, passwords or site preferences. What does Private Browsing not save? Visited pages Form and Search entries Passwords Downloads (downloaded files will still be saved to your device, but they will not appear in Firefox's download history) Cookies Temporary Internet files (cached files) Get a truly private browsing experience with Firefox for Android. Use the private tab to visit websites without being traced or tracked. Private Browsing will: Prevent history, passwords and entries from being saved Stop autofilling forms and search fields Block cookies Block temporary Internet files Block third-party tracking elements on web pages you visit. (Tip: You can turn this off at any time. See Tracking Protection in Firefox for Android) Table of Contents 1 What does Private Browsing not save? 2 Open a private tab 3 View open private tabs Open a private tab Open a blank, private tab: Tap the Firefox Menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) , then tap New Private Tab. Open a link in a private tab: Long-tap on a link to bring up a menu and choose Open link in Private Tab. View open private tabs Tap the tab icon at the top of your screen, then tap the mask icon to view the sites you've opened in Private Browsing. To close a tab, tap the X next to the tab you want to close. You can also close all open tabs by tapping the menu button, then Close Private Tabs. Warning: Private Browsing doesn't make you anonymous on the Internet. Your Internet service provider, employer (if using your employer's WiFi, for example), or the sites themselves can still track what pages you visit.
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REDIRECT How do I use Do-not-track on Firefox for Android?
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Tracking generally refers to the collection of a person’s browsing data across multiple sites. Firefox for Android’s Tracking Protection feature uses a list provided by Disconnect to identify and block trackers. Read more about tracking and the standards Disconnect uses to create its list. Learn more about the lists used by Firefox for Android for Tracking Protection. Tracking Protection in Private Browsing When you open a Private Tab on Firefox for Android, Tracking Protection is enabled by default. When you visit a web page with trackers, a shield icon will appear in the address bar to let you know that Firefox is actively blocking trackers on that page. Disable Tracking Protection on a specific page If you are on a website and you want to view the page with tracking enabled, you can disable Tracking Protection by following these steps: Tap the shield icon on the address bar to see the Control center. Tap Disable protection to turn Tracking Protection off. A red line will appear across the shield when Tracking Protection has been deactivated. To re-enable Tracking Protection, repeat the steps above to open the Control Center and tap Enable protection. Change your Tracking Protection settings in Private Browsing Tracking Protection is enabled by default in Private Browsing for additional privacy. Follow these steps to disable it on all pages you visit. Tap the menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser). Tap Settings, followed by Privacy. Remove the check mark next to Tracking protection: Enabled in Private Browsing to disable it. To re-enable Tracking Protection, repeat these steps and add a check mark to the box.
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It's helpful for Mozilla's engineers to be able to measure how Firefox for Android behaves in the real world. The Telemetry feature provides this capability by sending them performance and usage information. As you use Firefox, Telemetry measures and collects non-personal
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Firefox for Android offers you control over your personal data, such as browsing history, passwords and more. You can conveniently save this data to your browser and delete it any time you want to: This article applies to the latest version of Firefox for Android. Please update your version first to enjoy these features.   Clear your entire browsing history Go to the History panel on your home screen. Tap on Clear browsing history at the bottom of the History panel. Tap OK to confirm. Clear specific items from your browser Tap the menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) and select Settings (you may need to tap More first) . Tap Privacy and choose Clear now. Put a check mark next to the items you want to clear and then tap Clear data Tap the Menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) and select Settings (you may need to tap More first) . Scroll down to the Privacy & Security section and choose Clear private data. Select the items you want to clear and then tap Clear data Delete data on exit This option automatically deletes your selected data (bookmarks, browsing or search history, saved passwords, and more) every time you quit Firefox: Tap the menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) and select Settings (you may need to tap More first) . Tap Privacy and put a check mark next to Always clear when quitting. In the pop-up window, select the types of information that you'd like to delete each time you quit Firefox, then tap Set. Firefox will delete your information each time you close it through the Quit option on the menu.
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Mozilla is committed to your privacy: Firefox Privacy Policy When you install any software on an Android device, Android will declare all the functions that the software is capable of, such as accessing your camera, contacts or location. Each permission is accompanied with a brief description to offer an understanding for what it may be used for. In order to install the software, you must acknowledge that you're aware of what the software is capable of by giving Android your permission. Firefox is capable of the following functions, and Android will require you to accept all of them in order to finish installing it. Each time you visit a website that requires a specific function, such as taking or uploading a picture or finding your location, Android will ask you for permission before it performs that function. Here's an explanation of these permissions: Google has recently simplified the app permissions lists, so you might not see all the permissions displayed here. See the Google Support page for more details. Storage - Modify/delete SD card contents. This allows Firefox to save downloaded files to the SD card. Firefox will also store its own settings and history on the SD card if you use the Android Settings app to move Firefox to SD storage. Your location (GPS location) - GPS location is used only when you choose to share your location with a website. Firefox never uses your location itself or shares it with a website without your permission. Learn more about Firefox's location controls. Take pictures and videos - When a web page requests an image file to upload, you may choose to take a picture with your device's built-in camera. If a site wishes to use your microphone for communication, you may choose to share that as well — such is the case with sites using WebRTC. Firefox will always display a message asking for permission each time a site asks to add a photo or record audio. It never records audio, takes pictures or records video unless you opt-in each time it asks. Network communication (Full Internet access) - This gives Firefox permission to download web pages, add-ons, and other content over the Internet. System Tools (Install shortcuts) - This allows you to add bookmarks or web app shortcuts to your device home screen using Firefox. System Tools - The Adobe Flash plug-in uses this permission in versions of Firefox that include Flash support. System Tools - Modify global system settings. Firefox uses this permission to enable or disable your Firefox Sync account when you change the global sync settings on your device. Your accounts - This allows you to manage the accounts list and use the login credentials of an account. If you set up Firefox Sync, then Firefox uses these permissions to add your sync account to the Android sync settings. Control Near Field Communication (NFC) - Allows the use of the NFC chip on the device. Firefox uses this permission to share tabs by tapping two devices with NFC together. Wi-Fi connection information - Allows Firefox to view whether a Wi-Fi is enabled and the names of devices that are connected to it. This information allows Location Services to work. Download Manager - Allows Firefox to download files through the Download Manager without showing the user any notifications. Draw over other apps - Allows Firefox to load links in the background while you're using another app. This permission applies only to some devices.
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  This feature has been improved in the latest version of Firefox for Android. Update Firefox for Android to use the improved version.   When you see the shield icon in the address bar, it means that Firefox for Android has blocked content that is insecure on the page you're visiting. We'll explain what that means and what options you have.     What is mixed content? HTTP is a system for transmitting information from a web server to your browser. HTTP is not secure, so when you visit a page served over HTTP, your connection is open for eavesdropping and man-in-the-middle attacks. Most websites are served over HTTP because they don't involve passing sensitive information back and forth and do not need to be secured. When you visit a page fully transmitted over HTTPS, like your bank, you'll see a green padlock icon in the address bar (see How do I tell if my connection to a website is secure? for details). This means that your connection is authenticated and encrypted, hence safeguarded from eavesdroppers and man-in-the-middle attacks. However, if the HTTPS page you visit includes HTTP content, the HTTP portion can be read or modified by attackers, even though the main page is served over HTTPS. When an HTTPS page has HTTP content, we call that content “mixed”. The page you are visiting is only partially encrypted and even though it appears to be secure, it isn't. Note: For more information about mixed content (active and passive), see this blog post. What are the risks of mixed content? An attacker can replace the HTTP content on the page you're visiting in order to steal your credentials, take over your account, acquire sensitive data about you, or attempt to install malware on your computer.   What options do I have? Most websites will continue to work normally without any action on your part. If you need to allow the mixed content to be displayed, you can do that easily: Tap the shield icon in the address bar and a menu will drop down. Then tap Disable protection. The icon in the address bar will change to a crossed out shield icon to remind you that insecure content is being displayed. To reverse the previous action (re-block mixed content), re-visit the page in a new tab. Firefox automatically protects you from attacks by blocking potentially harmful insecure content on pages. Firefox will display a grey warning triangle or crossed-out lock to indicate that mixed content has loaded on the page.     What is mixed content? HTTP is a system for transmitting information from a web server to your browser. HTTP is not secure, so when you visit a page served over HTTP, your connection is open for eavesdropping and man-in-the-middle attacks. Most websites are served over HTTP because they don't involve passing sensitive information back and forth and do not need to be secured. When you visit a page fully transmitted over HTTPS, like your bank, you'll see a green padlock icon in the address bar (see How do I tell if my connection to a website is secure? for details). This means that your connection is authenticated and encrypted, hence safeguarded from eavesdroppers and man-in-the-middle attacks. However, if the HTTPS page you visit includes HTTP content, the HTTP portion can be read or modified by attackers, even though the main page is served over HTTPS. When an HTTPS page has HTTP content, we call that content “mixed”. The page you are visiting is only partially encrypted and even though it appears to be secure, it isn't. Note: For more information about mixed content (active and passive), see this blog post. What are the risks of mixed content? An attacker can replace the HTTP content on the page you're visiting in order to steal your credentials, take over your account, acquire sensitive data about you, or attempt to install malware on your computer.   How do I know if a page has mixed content? If you see the green lock icon in the address bar, the page is secure. If the page had any insecure elements, Firefox already blocked them to keep the page secure. Tap the icon to view more security information, and see whether or not Firefox had blocked any insecure elements. Firefox will display a grey warning triangle when insecure passive content is present and loaded on a page. If you see this icon, be aware that attackers may be able to manipulate parts of the page, for example, by displaying misleading or inappropriate content, but they shouldn’t be able to steal your personal data from the site. If you see a lock with a red line over it, Firefox is not blocking insecure elements, and that page is open to eavesdropping and attacks where your personal data from the site could be stolen. Unless you’ve unblocked mixed content using the instructions in the next section, you shouldn’t see this icon. Advanced users only: unblock mixed content If you need to unblock mixed content, you can do that by changing your about:config settings. This setting will affect all the pages you visit: Go to about:config. Change the security.mixed_content.block_active_content setting to false to unblock HTTP content. You'll know when Firefox is not blocking potentially harmful insecure content when you see the lock icon with a red line across it: Warning: Unblocking mixed content can leave you vulnerable to attacks. Developers: If your website is generating security errors because of insecure content, see this MDN article on how to fix a website with mixed content.
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Firefox can save usernames and passwords that you use to access online services, such as banking and email. In order to prevent someone else from accessing your accounts if they have your device, you can set a master password. This article explains how to use a master password. Table of Contents 1 How does the master password work? 2 How do I set up a master password? 3 How do I remove a master password? 4 What can I do if I forget my master password? How does the master password work? After you have defined a master password, you will be prompted to enter it when Firefox needs to access your stored passwords. This will "unlock" the usernames and passwords that you've saved and Firefox will automatically fill them in for you as you browse from website to website. When you are done using the web, you can quit Firefox to "lock up" your usernames and passwords. Note: The Android system on your device may quit Firefox automatically to free up resources when you are using another app. If that happens, you'll be asked to enter your master password again when you switch back to Firefox. How do I set up a master password? By default, Firefox doesn't use a master password to protect your saved usernames and passwords. To set one up: Tap the Menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) and then Settings (you may need to tap More first) . Tap the Use master password check box. Type a password into the entry fields. Tip: Remember to make your password something that is easy for you to remember, but difficult for others to guess. See Create secure passwords to keep your identity safe to learn how. To set the master password, tap OK. Tap the Menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) and then Settings (you may need to tap More first) . Then tap Privacy and choose Use master password. Type a password into the entry fields. Tip: Remember to make your password something that is easy for you to remember, but difficult for others to guess. See Create secure passwords to keep your identity safe to learn how. To set the master password, tap OK. When Master Password is enabled, passwords will stop syncing to Firefox for Android. How do I remove a master password? If you want to stop using a master password, you can easily remove it: Tap the Menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) and then Settings (you may need to tap More first) . Tap the Use master password check box. Type your master password into the entry field. Tap OK to remove the Master Password. Tap the Menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) and then Settings (you may need to tap More first) . Then tap Privacy. Tap the Use master password check box. Type your master password into the entry field. Tap OK to remove the Master Password. When Master Password is disabled, passwords will begin syncing again. What can I do if I forget my master password? If you've forgotten your master password, you'll have to reset it: Warning: Resetting your master password will remove all of your saved usernames and passwords. Delete Firefox for Android data from Android Settings. The master password will be deleted and you'll be able to reset it.
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  Most major websites track their visitors' behavior and then sell or provide that information to other companies. This information can be used to show ads, products or services specifically targeted to you. Firefox has a Do Not Track feature that lets you tell every website you visit, their advertisers, and content providers that you don't want your browsing behavior tracked. Honoring this setting is voluntary — individual websites are not required to respect it. Websites that do honor this setting should automatically stop tracking your behavior without any further action from you. Turning on this feature will not affect your ability to log in to websites nor cause Firefox to forget your private information, such as the contents of shopping carts, location information or login information. Note: You may see less relevant advertising on websites if you have the Do Not Track option activated.   How do I turn the Do-not-track feature on? The Do-not-track feature is turned off by default. To turn it on: Tap the Menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) and then Settings (you may need to tap More first) . Next tap Tracking and choose Tell sites that I do not want to be tracked. A check mark will appear to show that the feature is enabled. Tap the menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser) , followed by Settings. Tap Privacy. On the Privacy screen, put a check mark next to Do not track. Other tracking options There are two other tracking options: Tell sites that I want to be tracked: Choosing this option will tell websites that you want to be tracked by advertisers and other third-parties. You should be aware that many companies build a profile of sites you visit. Checking this option means that you are okay with that. Do not tell sites anything about my tracking preferences: This is the default setting. Choosing this option will not tell websites anything about your preferences. You should note that this does not mean that you will not be tracked. In fact it's effectively the same as the previous option, and you are likely going to be tracked.   Tracking Protection: If you have Tracking Protection turned on, Firefox will tell websites not to track you, regardless of your Do Not Track setting.
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