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Where are my logins stored?

Site Moderator

Where are my logins stored?

This article was incorrectly migrated as a support forum post and will no longer be maintained. For the current content, please see the following:

Where are my logins stored?

 

 

Did Firefox save my logins? Did this website save them? How do I control what logins are entered automatically on websites? We'll explain how to store your logins so you can control what happens automatically.

How to tell where your login will be stored

Your logins may be stored in the Firefox Password Manager and in cookies.

The Firefox Password Manager securely stores the usernames and passwords you use to access websites and then automatically fills them in for you the next time you visit.

When you enter a username and password Firefox hasn't already stored for a website, Firefox's Remember Password prompt will ask if you want Firefox to remember them. When you click Remember Password, the next time you visit the website, Firefox will automatically log you in to the website.

A cookie is a piece of information that a website stores on your computer. Some websites will save your login information on cookies.

When you visit a website and check a box that says something like, "Remember me", the website will save your login information, such as your username and password or just your username, on a cookie. The next time you visit the website, your computer will send your login cookie back to the website, and you'll be logged in automatically or required to enter your password but not your username to log in.

Note: You can store your login information in both the Firefox Password Manager and cookies.

The pros and cons of storing your logins in the Password Manager and cookies

The Firefox Password Manager

One advantage of using the Firefox Password Manager is that it stores all your logins - your usernames and passwords - in one single place. You can find your logins in the Firefox Password Manager and not worry about forgetting where they are.

On the other hand, putting all your logins in one place, unprotected, can be risky. Theoretically, someone who has access to your computer could open and view your logins in the Firefox Password Manager and go on an Amazon shopping spree ! Fortunately, Firefox lets you use a master password to prevent others from accessing your logins without your permission.

Cookies

An advantage of using cookies is that they can keep you logged in a website so that you can skip the login page and quickly get to where you want. Facebook and Twitter's cookies will let you do this, for instance.

One disadvantage of using cookies is that they will lose your login information whenever you clear your computer's cookies and cache. This could happen by accident if you are trying to fix a problem between your computer and a website. So you would then need to re-enter your login information the next time you visited your favorite websites.

Strategies for saving your login information

Use phrases to create easy to remember passwords

If you want the most secure method for storing your login information, then you should rely on your memory. It's easier than you think. Choose a different login for every website and memorize them. See Create secure passwords to keep your identity safe for details.

Use the Password Manager and the Master Password

Maybe you need some help remembering all of those logins. The next most secure method is to choose a different login for every website, save them in the Password Manager when prompted and then secure everything with a master password.

Master Password - Win1

Use the Password Manager without the Master Password

Perhaps the risk of someone accessing websites with your logins is low — your computer doesn't leave the house, it's connected to a secure network and the people who use it are trusted. In that case, you can just choose a different login for every website, save those logins in the Password Manager and skip the Master password.

Store your logins in both the Password Manager and cookies

Maybe what you are really looking for is speed - you want to skip those login pages you might otherwise have to visit many times a day. If your computer is in safe hands and the websites are low risk (ones not connected to a credit card), you can store your logins in both the Password Manager and cookies.

Note: No matter what method you use to sign in, you should always make sure you sign in on a secure page. To learn more about how to do this, see the article, How do I tell if my connection to a website is secure?

How to manage your logins

If you would like to change or delete your usernames, passwords or cookies, you can easily do so and here are some articles to show you how:

Additional password management software

Here are some password management tools that have extra features and work across multiple browsers, operating systems, and mobile devices:

RoboForm completely automates password entering and form filling with one click, which is very efficient for companies and their employees.

1Password works exceptionally well with all browsers and stores more than just passwords, such as credit card numbers, bank information, software licenses and user id information.

Lastpass is free and is available for just about every commonly used computing platform, including mobile devices.

25 REPLIES

Re: Where are my logins stored?

Hey guys. I am beginning to work on drafting this article and have a question regarding this content request: "Explain that you can generally save your un & pw in Firefox, with a cookie or both".

So is this statement asking me to explain 1) how a user's username and password can be saved with Firefox's Password Manager, 2) how a user's username and password can be saved with a cookie from the website the user is visiting, and 3) how a user's username and password can be saved both with Firefox's Password Manager AND with a cookie from the website the user is visiting?

Thanks, Adam

P.S. If this isn't the right place for me to be posting this question, please send me a link.

Site Moderator

Re: Where are my logins stored?

(For the record) This is about the following article summary and notes that Michael Verdi wrote in the placeholder for this article (see the article History)

Search results summary:

Did Firefox save my login info? Did this website save it? How do I control what gets entered automatically? We'll explain how this works so can take control.

!-- Notes:
  • Explain that you can generally save your un & pw in Firefox, with a cookie or both
  • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of each method
  • Explain the advantages & disadvantages using a master password
  • Explain how to delete a un & pw from Firefox
  • Explain how to delete cookies for a website
  • Explain what third-party password managers do
  • List up to three widely used apps (last pass?)

If you don't get an answer here, your best bet would be to either post your questions in the KB articles forum or else contact Michael Verdi directly (e.g., by email, irc or private message).

SUMO Contributor

Re: Where are my logins stored?

Hi Adam,
Thanks so much for getting the article this far. Now let's see if we can polish it. To keep things simple, let's focus on one section at a time.

How do I save my logins?

Your logins can be saved and stored in the Firefox Password Manager. The Firefox Password Manager securely stores the usernames and passwords you use to access websites and then automatically fills them in for you the next time you visit. For a general overview of using the Password Manager to save website passwords, see Password Manager - Remember, delete, change and import saved passwords in Firefox.

Your logins can also be saved and stored in website cookies. A cookie is information stored on your computer by a website you visit. Cookies often store your settings for a website, such as your preferred language or location. When you return to the website, Firefox sends back the cookies that belong to the website. This allows the website to present you with information customized to fit your needs. For a general overview of cookies, see Cookies - Information that websites store on your computer.

More specifically, website cookies securely store the usernames and passwords you use to access websites and then automatically fill them in for you the next time you visit. In some browsers, each website cookie is a small file, but in Firefox, all website cookies are stored in a single file called the cookies.sqlite file, located in the Firefox profile folder. For more information about the Firefox profile folder, see Profiles - Where Firefox stores your bookmarks, passwords and other user data.

The first thing I notice is that the second paragraph isn't needed. It's all about other things that cookies do but none of that is really relevant to this case. I think we can just remove it. One struggle we always have (which we don't always win) is trying to keep articles as concise as possible. But this looks like an easy win.

Now we're down to a paragraph about the password manager and one about cookies. Good. It seems to me the first key thing for people to understand is, like the title says, where are their logins being stored. How can you tell one method from the other? Can you rewrite the remaining two paragraphs to explain what it looks like when the password manager is saving your login and what it looks like when your login is being stored in a cookie? Maybe we can even rename the section something like, "How to tell where your login will be saved"

One thing to note for people (probably formatted as a note) is that you can save your login information both with the password manager and with a cookie.

One last thing about this section. That third paragraph about cookies goes into too much detail. For this article it's not important to understand the differences of how browsers store cookies and that Firefox uses a database in your profile folder. You can just explain a cookie as "a piece of information that a website stores on your computer."

Re: Where are my logins stored?

Hi Michael. Thanks for your patience. I've been doing some business, traveling between Ottawa and Toronto, but now I am back. Here is my new polished draft. I am going to be tweaking the wording the wording throughout today, so you may see some updated versions.

Re: Where are my logins stored?

Hmm. . .not sure where to put the polished article. I'm going to add the new polished draft to the webpage, "Where are my logins stored?". Please let me know if my placing it there is a mistake.

SUMO Contributor

Re: Where are my logins stored?

adampeebleswrites said

Hmm. . .not sure where to put the polished article. I'm going to add the new polished draft to the webpage, "Where are my logins stored?". Please let me know if my placing it there is a mistake.

You're doing great! You can keep adding new revisions based on the previous (not yet approved revision) by going to the history section of the article and clicking the pencil at the right side of your revision.

Re: Where are my logins stored?

Thanks for your swift feedback Michael. I will follow your instructions.

Also, just so you know, I'm well aware that the content may look long and wordy in that section now. My next step today is going to be trimming it down and rewording some of the content.

SUMO Contributor

Re: Where are my logins stored?

adampeebleswrites said

Thanks for your swift feedback Michael. I will follow your instructions. Also, just so you know, I'm well aware that the content may look long and wordy in that section now. My next step today is going to be trimming it down and rewording some of the content.

No problem. Just let me know when you are ready for me to look at it.

Re: Where are my logins stored?

Hey Michael. I'm done polishing my draft for now. It's 30 words less than the original unpolished draft. Please feel free to recommend omitting any more paragraphs or sentences.