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Profiles - Where Firefox stores your bookmarks, passwords and other user data

All of the changes you make in Firefox, like your home page, what toolbars you use, extensions you have installed, saved passwords and your bookmarks, are all stored in a special folder, called a profile. Your profile folder is stored in a separate place from the Firefox program so that, if something ever goes wrong with Firefox, your information will still be there. It also means you can uninstall Firefox without losing your settings and you don't have to reinstall Firefox to clear your information or troubleshoot a problem.

This information is here for reference. You don't have to follow these steps unless you were directed to do so from another article.

How do I find my profile?

  1. Click the menu button New Fx Menu , click help Help-29 and select Troubleshooting Information. The Troubleshooting Information tab will open.

  2. Under the Application Basics section, click on Show FolderOpen FolderShow in FinderOpen Directory. A window with your profile filesfolder will open.
  3. Note: If you are unable to open or use Firefox, follow the instructions in Finding your profile without opening Firefox.

Finding your profile without opening Firefox

  1. Press Windows Key +R on the keyboard. A Run dialog will open.
  2. Type in:
    %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\
  3. Click OK. A window will open containing profile folders.
  4. Double-click the profile folder you wish to open. If you only have one profile, its folder would have "default" in the name.
  1. From the Start Screen, click the Desktop tile. The Desktop view will open.
  2. From the Desktop, hover in the lower right-hand corner to access the Charms.
  3. Select the Search charm. The Search sidebar will open.
  4. In the search box, type in:
    %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\
    without pressing Enter. A list of profile folders will appear.
  5. Click on the profile folder you wish to open (it will open in a window). If you only have one profile, its folder would have "default" in the name.

  1. Click the Windows Start button. The Start menu will open.
  2. In the Search box at the bottom of the Start menu, type:
    %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\
    without pressing Enter. A list of profiles will appear at the top of the Start menu.
  3. Click on the profile folder you wish to open (it will open in a window). If you only have a single profile, its folder would have "default" in the name.

    ab167bec686b081a25849c98d6bf9ea7-1258940859-69-1.png
Alternatively, you can find your profile by pressing the Windows Key key and then start typing: %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\
  1. Click the Windows Start button, and select Run….

    win-run.png
  2. Type in:
    %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\
    then click OK.
    A window will open containing profile folders.
    win-rundialog.png
  3. Double-click the profile folder you wish to open. If you only have one profile, its folder would have "default" in the name.
  1. Open the Library folder for your Mac user account:
    • (OS X 10.6) Click the Finder icon in the dock. Your home folder will be selected, (usually the name of your Mac user account). In the right side of the window, click the Library folder to open it.
    • (OS X 10.7 or above) Click the Finder icon in the dock. On the menu bar, click the Go menu, hold down the option or alt key and select Library. A window will open containing your Library folder.
  2. Open the "Application Support" folder, then open the "Firefox" folder, and then the "Profiles" folder.
  3. Your profile folder is within this folder. If you only have one profile, its folder would have "default" in the name.
  1. (Ubuntu) Click the Places menu on the top right of the screen and select Home Folder. A File Browser window will appear.
  2. Click the View menu and select Show Hidden Files if it isn't already checked.
  3. Double click the folder marked .mozilla.
  4. Double click the folder marked firefox. Your profile folder is within this folder. If you only have one profile, its folder would have "default" in the name.

What information is stored in my profile?

Note: Only important information useful for recovering is described.
  • Bookmarks, Downloads and Browsing History: The places.sqlite file contains all your Firefox bookmarks and lists of all the files you've downloaded and websites you’ve visited. The bookmarkbackups folder stores bookmark backup files, which can be used to restore your bookmarks. For more information, see Create bookmarks to save your favorite webpages and Restore bookmarks from backup or move them to another computer.
  • Passwords: Your passwords are stored in the key3.db and logins.json files. For more information, see Password Manager - Remember, delete, change and import saved passwords in Firefox.
  • Site-specific preferences: The permissions.sqlite and content-prefs.sqlite files store many of your Firefox permissions (for instance, which sites are allowed to display popups) or zoom levels that are set on a site-by-site basis (see Font size and zoom - increase the size of web pages).
  • Search engines: The search.json.mozlz4 file stores the user-installed search engines that are available in the Firefox Search bar.
  • Personal dictionary: The persdict.dat file stores any custom words you have added to Firefox's dictionary. For more information, see How do I use the Firefox spell checker?.
  • Autocomplete history: The formhistory.sqlite file remembers what you have searched for in the Firefox search bar and what information you’ve entered into forms on websites. For more information, see Control whether Firefox automatically fills in forms.
  • Cookies: A cookie is a bit of information stored on your computer by a website you’ve visited. Usually this is something like your site preferences or login status. Cookies are all stored in the cookies.sqlite file.
  • DOM storage: DOM Storage is designed to provide a larger, more secure, and easier-to-use alternative to storing information in cookies. Information is stored in the webappsstore.sqlite file for websites and in the chromeappsstore.sqlite for about:* pages.
  • Extensions: The extensions folder, if it exists, stores files for any extensions you have installed. To learn more about Firefox extensions and other add-ons, see Find and install add-ons to add features to Firefox.
  • Security certificate settings: The cert8.db file stores all your security certificate settings and any SSL certificates you have imported into Firefox.
  • Security device settings: The secmod.db file is the security module database.
  • Download actions: The mimeTypes.rdf file stores your preferences that tell Firefox what to do when it comes across a particular type of file. For example, these are the settings that tell Firefox to open a PDF file with Acrobat Reader when you click on it. For more information, see Change what Firefox does when you click on or download a file.
  • Plugin MIME type: The pluginreg.dat file stores Internet media types related to your installed plugins. For more information, see Use plugins to play audio, video, games and more.
  • Stored session: The sessionstore.js file stores the currently open tabs and windows. For more information, see Restore previous session - Configure when Firefox shows your most recent tabs and windows.
  • Toolbar customization: The xulstore.json file stores toolbar and window size/position settings. For more information, see Customize Firefox controls, buttons and toolbars.
  • User preferences: The prefs.js file stores customized user preference settings, such as changes you make in Firefox OptionsPreferences dialogs. The optional user.js file, if one exists, will override any modified preferences.

Working with profiles

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Comments

See /forums/knowledge-base-articles/704538 for related discussions about this article.

Finding your profile without opening Firefox This section needs updating for Mac OS X 10.7 since apparently, Mac OS X Lion hides the ~/Library folder by default. According to https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3663481 you can open it by holding down the Option key while opening the Go menu in Finder, then selecting Library. Once it's open, you can drag the small icon of a folder in the header of the Library's window into the Favorites section of the Sidebar, where it will be conveniently accessible whenever you want. Can a Mac OS X 10.7 user confirm?

For other solutions see this osxdaily article or this CNET article.

Ref: http://kb.mozillazine.org/Show_hidden_files_and_folders#Mac_OS_X

This still needs updating, since Max users can't find the ~ / Library / Application Support / Firefox folder, as reported by this Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion user here:

Yes, as a Mac user I can confirm that holding down the alt key shows you the library folder. I'm adding that to the article.

Hi Alice and Kadir :)

I was editing the Italian article. Just a question. I'm a Mac user, but my OS X is 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard, and currently I can't update to the last OS X because, if I update, I must update my cad program too... 700 euro...). I think that you should edit the article adding again the old procedure for OS X 10.6 + the new procedure for 10.7/10.8 OS X. Do you agree? I think I'm not the only Mac user with OS X 10.6...

Thanks in advance and let me know

Michele

Hi Michele, you are absolutely right. I should have checked that this works in older Mac OS X versions too. Here is a suggestion: The old steps require people to type or copy and paste, that's very error prone. Instead we can leave the new steps and add one additional parenthesis, since the Library folder is visible in the user home folder in older versions: (If the "Library" item does not appear, select "User folder" and double click on "Library" in the window that appears)

What do you guys think? Also, someone with an English version of Mac OS would need to check what Apple uses for "user folder".

Oh, Hi, Kadir! I didn't see your reply before I made my revision and replied to michro! I think my revision is still OK. Could you review it? Thanks.

Hi, michro.

I also use Mac OS X 10.6.8 and the new instructions from the Sept 10, 2012 revision (approved yesterday) don't work!

I agree that any new revision should also work on Mac OS X 10.6. I made a new revision today (needs review approval)

For the record:
Here are the original Mac instructions from May 8 2012, which work for me on Mac OS X 10.6 (but not 10.7 or above)

  1. Open Finder and go to your home folder. Note: your home folder is usually the name of your Mac user account
  2. From your home folder open {filepath /Library/}, then {filepath /Application Support/}, then {filepath /Firefox/}, then {filepath /Profiles/}. Your profile folder is within this folder.

Michael Verdi revised the article on May 9, 2012 and these instructions do work for me, but involve a lot of typing:

  1. Click the Finder icon in the dock.
  2. On the menu bar, click the {menu Go} menu and select {menu Go to Folder...}
  3. In the Go to Folder window, paste in this text: ~/Library/Application Support/Firefox/Profiles and then click {button Go}
  4. A window will open containing profile folders.
  5. Double-click the folder with “default” in the name to open it.

Truthfully, when I added my August 3, 2012 comment to this thread, I missed the fact that Michael Verdi had fixed the Mac instructions on May 9, 2012 and that they did work on OS X 10.7 and above.

Here are the current instructions, which don't work on Mac OS X 10.6:

  1. Click the Finder icon in the dock.
  2. On the menu bar, click the {menu Go} menu, hold down the {key option} or {key alt} key and select {menu Library}
  3. A window will open containing your Library folder. Double Click to open the "Application Support" folder, then double click to open the "Firefox" folder, and double click again to open the "Profiles" folder.
  4. Double-click the folder with “default” in the name to open your profile.

Here is the revision I just made, that needs review/approval:


{for mac}

  1. Click the Finder icon in the dock and go to the Library folder for your Mac user account:
    • (OS X 10.6) Go to your home folder (usually the name of your Mac user account) and open the Library folder.
    • (OS X 10.7 or above) On the menu bar, click the {menu Go} menu, hold down the {key option} or {key alt} key and select {menu Library}. A window will open containing your Library folder.
  2. Open the "Application Support" folder, then open the "Firefox" folder, and then open the "Profiles" folder.
  3. Open the folder with “default” in the name to open your profile.

{/for}

Hi Alice, today is the day... I didn't see your reply because I was writing my reply without refreshing this page...

On Mac Os X 10.6, when I click the Finder icon in the dock, a window (with my user name on top) opens. In the left side, my user folder (the one with the "home" icon + my user name) is "highlighted" (blue color), and I can double click on the Library folder in the right side directly from the same window. I don't need to go on the the menu bar > click the "Go" menu, select "Go to Folder…", etc.

Or, without clicking the Finder icon in the dock, if I go on the menu bar, and I click the "Go" menu, I can select the voice with the "home" icon named "Home" (I think in English should be "Home", in Italian is "Inizio"). A window opens (the same window that I obtain when I click the Finder icon in the dock) with my "home" icon + user name "highlighted" in the left side and the Library in the right side.

So, maybe, we could write something like that for 10.6

(OS X 10.6) On the menu bar, click the {menu Go} menu, and select the Home voice. A window will open with your home folder (usually the name of your Mac user account) highlighted. Double click on the Library folder in the left side of the window.

What do you think about my proposal?

EDIT: Alice, forgive me ... I read more carefully your step for OS X 10.6 and I think it's ok. My proposal makes absolutely no sense.

michro said

EDIT: Alice, forgive me ... I read more carefully your step for OS X 10.6 and I think it's ok. My proposal makes absolutely no sense.

Hi, michro,

I'm on my Windows computer right now (I was on the Mac earlier) but I think my revision could be improved, maybe like this?

{for mac}

  1. Click the Finder icon in the dock.
  2. Open the Library folder for your Mac user account:
    • (OS X 10.6) With your home folder selected, (usually the name of your Mac user account) open the Library folder.
    • (OS X 10.7 or above) On the Finder menu bar, click the {menu Go} menu, hold down the {key option} or {key alt} key and select {menu Library}. A window will open containing your Library folder.
  3. Open the "Application Support" folder, then open the "Firefox" folder, and then open the "Profiles" folder.
  4. Open the folder with “default” in the name to open your profile.

{/for}

Anyway, I'll let Kadir review my pending revision before I make another one.

Hi Michele, I think your revision is good, but it relies on people knowing what version of Mac OS X they have. I'd guess that most people actually don't know. In that case it might be better to tell them to do something and give them fallback instructions if that does work. What do you think?

'KadirTopal said

Hi Michele, I think your revision is good, but it relies on people knowing what version of Mac OS X they have. I'd guess that most people actually don't know. In that case it might be better to tell them to do something and give them fallback instructions if that does work. What do you think?

Kadir, Did you mean to address this to me? If you don't like my revision because it assumes people know what Mac version they are on, can you make a new one? I think it should be done soon since right now, the instructions in your Sept 10 revision (approved Sept 11 by M Verdi) don't work on Mac OS X 10.6.

Forgive me but I do not have the gift of synthesis ;-)

Kadir, I do not think that people may have trouble figuring out what Mac version they are using (it's easier that they don't know the Firefox version because of rapid release cycle…).

OS X 10.6 or previous: If you click the Finder icon in the dock, a window opens. Ok? This window already shows your home folder selected and in the right side of the window you can see the Library folder. Why should I go on the menu bar, click the "Go" menu, and so on ? That made sense when you had to paste the text "~ / Library / Application Support / Firefox / Profiles." (same for OS X 10.7).

OS X 10.7 or above: Why should I click the Finder icon in the dock to open a window, and then "On the Finder menu bar, click the {menu Go} menu, hold down the {key option} or {key alt} key and select {menu Library}. A window will open containing your Library folder."?

I don't know how 10.7/10.8 work, so maybe you can explain it to me: You click the Finder icon in the dock. A windows opens. Then you go on the Finder menu bar, click the "Go" menu, etc. A window will open containing your Library folder. So, you have two windows open (the Finder window and the Library window) or...? If so, I think that an OS X 10.7 user could go directly on the Finder menu bar without clicking the Finder icon in the dock. Why should I click the Finder icon in the dock?

Alice and Kadir, what do you think about something like this?

{for mac}

  1. Open the Library folder for your Mac user account:
    • (OS X 10.6 or previous) Click the Finder icon in the dock. A window will open with your home folder selected, (usually the name of your Mac user account). In the right side of the window, double-click the Library folder to open it.
    • (OS X 10.7 or above) On the Finder menu bar, click the {menu Go} menu, hold down the {key option} or {key alt} key and select {menu Library}. A window will open containing your Library folder.
  2. Double-click to open the "Application Support" folder, then double click to open the "Firefox" folder, and double click again to open the "Profiles" folder.
  3. Double-click to open the folder with “default” in the name to open your profile.

{/for}

Of course you are free to review and edit my proposal. ;-)

Michele, the way it works on Lion and Mountain Lion is: You open the "Go to" menu, then you press the alt/option key and it displays the "Library" item in the menu. You click it and it opens that folder, only one window.

I'll leave the decision about the steps to you guys, you have edited way more articles than me, and if we assume that people know whether they are using 10.6 or 10.7 in other places, let's do that here too.

KadirTopal said

I'll leave the decision about the steps to you guys, you have edited way more articles than me, and if we assume that people know whether they are using 10.6 or 10.7 in other places, let's do that here too.

Based on that I self-approved my Sept 12, 2012 revision, to get the instructions that don't work on Mac OS X 10.6 and below fixed right away. I didn't mark it ready to localize yet, in case someone else wants to create a new revision to improve upon it. I made a new revision (based on what michro proposed) that needs review.

michro said

Alice and Kadir, what do you about something like this? {for mac}
  1. Open the Library folder for your Mac user account:
    • (OS X 10.6 or previous) Click the Finder icon in the dock. A window will open with your home folder selected, (usually the name of your Mac user account). In the right side of the window, double-click the Library folder to open it.
    • (OS X 10.7 or above) On the Finder menu bar, click the {menu Go} menu, hold down the {key option} or {key alt} key and select {menu Library}. A window will open containing your Library folder.
  2. Double-click to open the "Application Support" folder, then double click to open the "Firefox" folder, and double click again to open the "Profiles" folder.
  3. Double-click to open the folder with “default” in the name to open your profile.
{/for}

Of course you are free to review and edit my proposal. ;-)

I made a new revision based on the above but I made a few changes:

  • I added "Click the Finder icon in the dock" to the Mac 10.7 instructions.
  • I also removed "double-click" for opening subsequent folders, since I don't remember needing to do thaton Mac OS X 10.6. Could you check that?

AliceWyman said

I made a new revision based on the above but I made a few changes:
  • I added "Click the Finder icon in the dock" to the Mac 10.7 instructions.
  • I also removed "double-click" for opening subsequent folders, since I don't remember needing to do thaton Mac OS X 10.6. Could you check that?

Just a little question (OS X 10.7): Why should I "Click the Finder icon in the dock"? Can't I go directly on the menu bar, click the Go menu, etc ? I'm just asking this because I don't know how the 10.7 version works, but according to this reply...

KadirTopal said

Michele, the way it works on Lion and Mountain Lion is: You open the "Go to" menu, then you press the alt/option key and it displays the "Library" item in the menu. You click it and it opens that folder, only one window.

...I understand that you can avoid clicking the Finder icon in the dock.

As regards the "double-click": I tryed now, and I must double-click every folder to open it.

Alice, thanks as usual for your patience ;-)

michro said

...I understand that you can avoid clicking the Finder icon in the dock. As regards the "double-click": I tryed now, and I must double-click every folder to open it. Alice, thanks as usual for your patience ;-)

I suppose you should always say to click the Finder icon in the dock, in case the user has another application open?

On the double-click, I just checked on my Mac and ity depends on how you are viewing the files and folders. If you have your view set to icons, then yes, you must double-click. If you have your view set to columns, like I do, then you only need a single click. I think the way I wrote it is best, because it only says to "open" successive folders.

Anyway, my new revision is pen ding approval so hopefully Michael Verdi or another Team member will make an executive decision :-)

AliceWyman said

I suppose you should always say to click the Finder icon in the dock, in case the user has another application open?

I think you're right.

On the double-click, I just checked on my Mac and ity depends on how you are viewing the files and folders. If you have your view set to icons, then yes, you must double-click. If you have your view set to columns, like I do, then you only need a single click. I think the way I wrote it is best, because it only says to "open" successive folders.

You're right again… I have my view set to list, so I must double-click (icons and list need double-click).

Anyway, my new revision is pen ding approval so hopefully Michael Verdi or another Team member will make an executive decision :-)

Maybe you could try to contact Michael via private message, because (in my opinion), this revision needs a fast review approval ;-)

Thanks, Alice :-)

michro said

Maybe you could try to contact Michael via private message, because (in my opinion), this revision needs a fast review approval ;-)

I hate to bother Michael, he's so busy, especially since the SUMO redesign is going to start going into effect tomorrow and through the weekend, according to the last meeting video from Sept 10th!

I think we can hold out for awhile longer ...OK? Anyway, at least the English KB got updated with the "interim" revision I made Sept 12th and just approved (though it isn't marked ready to localize)

Any news? Anyone reviewing and approving Alice's revision? I'd like to update the Italian article...

Thanks for the reminder, Michro. Alice, I approved your revision and I fixed a small gramme issue.

Thanks Kadir. I'll edit the Italian article. Let's go! :)

Mike89

I am planning on clean installing Windows 7. In my current Windows 7 I have Firefox installed. When I clean install Windows 7 and install Firefox again, I want to have it quickly up running exactly with the same settings/bookmarks etc as is was before so I don't have to do it all again. Which files do I need to copy from Firefox before I clean install to do this? This is info here on profiles not nothing mentioned about getting all info from a previous Firefox install to move to a new OS install. Would be really nice for you guys to make a tutorial on doing this.

sgorantla3331

Hi

I am trying to deploy firefox to somewhere around 2500 users. I need to have the certificates go along with the installation. I have tried to run vbscripts and I have also created a "profile" folder in defaults and also pasted the cert8.db file that has been obtained after the import of that certificates from the *.defaults folder. But I had no luck with it.

Where exactly do i need to put this cert8.db file. This is the location I have tried in putting it in "C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\defaults\profile\cert8.db" which did not work.

I tried to create a xpi file which has just the certificates. that was a bummer too.

Is there any way that I can automate this process.

Thanks a lot

Great question. Please repost your exact post here:
https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/new

And someone will be able to help you. Unfortunately this area is not in a public place, it's somewhat hidden. You have a much higher chance of getting an answer using that link I gave you above because many of our support people are there.

I think I have an idea of what to do but I need to think on it some more. In the meantime please repost your question using the link I gave and I will add my comment there.

Even though it's not listed under "What Links Here", at least two templates also link to this article, Template:OpenProfileFolder and Template:profileFolder .

See my post here:

/forums/knowledge-base-articles/709830#post-55933 Policy on removal of section headers from kb articles

AliceWyman said

I was going to say to check the "What links here" list before changing any article's section headings. What comes to mind are existing links in two important templates, that go to the Profiles - Where Firefox stores your bookmarks, passwords and other user data article section, "#w_finding-your-profile-without-opening-firefox".

The templates /kb/templateopenprofilefolder and /kb/Template:profileFolder both link to that article section but for some reason, the Profiles - Where Firefox stores your bookmarks, passwords and other user data article "What links here" list, /kb/profiles-where-firefox-stores-use.../links doesn't include the two templates.

Related discussion:

Thanks, Alice. I've updated this article per the related discussion.

This article has a What information is stored in my profile? section and mentions which files store what information, That section includes the localstore.rdf file, in the Toolbar customization paragraph.

Localstore.rdf will be deprecated and replaced with an xulstore .json file in Firefox 34, according to this bug report:

I also think that this section is missing a User-set preferences paragraph with information about the prefs.js file (and optional user.js file?) , since prefs.js is mentioned in both Reset Firefox preferences to troubleshoot and fix problems and How to fix preferences that won't save. The about:config page, where preference settings can be viewed and modified, also comes up frequently on the support forum, and modified preferences are also described in Use the Troubleshooting Information page to help fix Firefox issues.Edit: I'll start a new thread on other needed changes.

The "What information is stored in my profile?" section currently says this:

Passwords: Your passwords are stored in the key3.db and signons.sqlite files. For more information, see Password manager - Remember, delete and change saved passwords in Firefox.

Looks like this will change in Firefox 32? I don't have a bug reference (need to research it) but see: /forums/contributors/710634?#post-61735 Firefox 32 Release / Issues / Status

cor-el said

Note that Firefox 32 and later builds store the passwords in the logins.json file in the profile folder and no longer use the signons.sqlite file. You can force Firefox to reimport the passwords from the signons.sqlite file.
  • reset the signon.importedFromSqlite pref on the about:config page to the default value via the right-click context menu
  • delete the logins.json file in the Firefox profile folder with Firefox closed
When you restart Firefox then you should have the signon.importedFromSqlite pref with the value set to true and you should have the passwords imported in the Password Manager unless there may have been errors.

I also think that this section is missing a User-set preferences paragraph with information about the prefs.js file (and optional user.js file?) , since prefs.js is mentioned in both Reset Firefox preferences to troubleshoot and fix problems and How to fix preferences that won't save. The about:config page, where preference settings can be viewed and modified, also comes up frequently on the support forum, and modified preferences are also described in Use the Troubleshooting Information page to help fix Firefox issues.

Related bug, fixed in Fx32:

  • Bug 853549 - Remove main-thread I/O from password manager

From comment 60:

Can't delete the sqlite file yet. If we do, that means someone trying a build with this code and then downgrading will lose all their logins (because the old version can't read the JSON file).
We should do basically what the current code does -- try to load logins.json, and if it's not there try to import from signons.sqlite. [And if you don't have any logins, store an empty JSON file to prevent trying to import every time.]
In a few releases, we can nuke the old signon.sqlite (and maybe the import code too). See bug 717490 / bug 925101, but let's not wait quite that long. :) Maybe after the next ESR?

I made a revision to the "What information is stored in my profile?" section to include the following (pending review/approval)

  • "Passwords": changed signons.sqlite to logins.json for fx32,
  • Added a paragraph for "User preferences" (prefs.js and user.js)
  • "Bookmarks ...": added bookmarkbackups folder and kb article link

Thanks, Alice.

From what I can tell, we just need to hide the "toolbar customization" paragraph for > fx34? I've submitted a revision but I didn't self-approve in case I'm wrong.

Joni

Joni said

Thanks, Alice. From what I can tell, we just need to hide the "toolbar customization" paragraph for > fx34? I've submitted a revision but I didn't self-approve in case I'm wrong. Joni

Joni, maybe you should ask one of the experts to review bug 559505 and see if the paragraph should be changed to the following, instead of making it {for not fx34} ?

*Toolbar customization: The {for not fx34}{filepath localstore.rdf}{for fx34} {filepath xulstore.json} file stores toolbar and window size/position settings. For more information, see Customize Firefox controls, buttons and toolbars.

See this post by philipp today:

philipp said

just as a heads up for contributors - localstore.rdf got replaced with xulstore.json in firefox 34, so this file would need to be edited/renamed/deleted for manual troubleshooting of issues with the UI. https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=559505

I made a new revision to add the following to this article:

{for not fx34}
*Toolbar customization: The {filepath localstore.rdf} file stores toolbar and window size/position settings. For more information, see Customize Firefox controls, buttons and toolbars.
{/for}
{for fx34}
*Toolbar customization: The {filepath xulstore.json} file stores toolbar and window size/position settings. For more information, see Customize Firefox controls, buttons and toolbars.
{/for}

The "Finding your profile without opening Firefox" section is empty when the Windows 10 selector is used to view this artricle. Need to add {for win10} content.

Hi Alice, yes, probably the next is the correct to find the Run command in win10.

Start icon on the taskbar(down left corner) > All apps > Windows System folder at the bottom of the Apps list > expand it > Run

the other i think is the same...

please anyone with win10 to confirm the above

i'm posting 2-3 articles for help (i don't have win 10)

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/getstarted-whatsnew-cortana

http://winaero.com/blog/add-run-to-start-menu-in-windows-10-on-the-left-or-right-side/

https://news.microsoft.com/download/presskits/windows/docs/windowstechnicalpreviewqg.pdf

Alice, please feel free to delete the above articles (if it is too much for that discussion) or post them somewhere else for help ?

thank you

Looks like typing in the Windows 10 search bar, which is now located on the taskbar, includes web results by default, so it isn't the best method to open a folder. See http://winaero.com/blog/disable-web-search-in-windows-10-taskbar/

Maybe we should tell Windows 10 users to press the Windows key Windows Key + R on the keyboard to open a Run dialog (like we do in the Use the Profile Manager to create and remove Firefox profiles article) and then enter %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\  ? That works in Windows 7.

Hopefully a Windows 10 user can make a new revision for win10 with screenshots and updated instructions.

AliceWyman said

Maybe we should tell Windows 10 users to press the Windows key + R on the keyboard to open a Run dialog (like we do in the Use the Profile Manager to create and remove Firefox profiles article) and then enter %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\  ? That works in Windows 7.

Works in win 10 also : http://reviews.gizmodo.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-windows-10-keyboard-shortcuts-1720656591

I made a revision to the "Finding your profile without opening Firefox" section for win10 with instructions using the Run dialog box (plus other small edits) . Can a Windows 10 user check my revision and add screenshots, if possible?

I went ahead and approved my pending revision.

MadsHaupt

May i update the image for win7 in the "Finding profile without opening Firefox" section?

MadsHaupt said

May i update the image for win7 in the "Finding profile without opening Firefox" section?

You mean this image? [[Image:ab167bec686b081a25849c98d6bf9ea7-1258940859-69-1.png]]

ab167bec686b081a25849c98d6bf9ea7-1258940859-69-1.png

What image would you replace it with and why? You can upload a new image to the Media Gallery first, and link to it here in this thread.

MadsHaupt

Yes, it is this image.

Here is the image i will replace it with: Find profiles with start menu - Aero - Win7

I think that the existing image is better. Your image shows two default profiles so it would confuse users (the instructions say, Click on the profile with “default” in the name .... Besides, %APPDATA% is cut off.

MadsHaupt

You are quite right that it may confuse the user if the instructions say "a profile" and the image says "two profiles".

But what about those users there really see two profiles. I also think that they are a bit confused.

Thinking you we need to add a short explanation of why they see two profiles with "default" if they do/to those who do?

MadsHaupt said

You are quite right that it may confuse the user if the instructions say "a profile" and the image says "two profiles". But what about those users there really see two profiles. I also think that they are a bit confused. Thinking you we need to add a short explanation of why they see two profiles with "default" if they do/to those who do?

You're right. I made a new revision to account for multiple profiles. It's pending review.

I still think that the existing image showing a single "default" profile folder is better than the one you submitted. A single profile with its folder name ending in ".default" would cover most cases. With two profiles, one would end in ".default" but the other should end in a different name. My pending edit accounts for that but keeps the existing image showing a single profile folder.

In your case, you have two xxxxxxxx.default folders listed under %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\ With two profiles, one would end in ".default" but the other should normally end in a different name. When you go to create a second profile using the Profile Manager, the new profile name that comes up by default is "Default User". If you try to change it to Default or default, you get a message that a profile with that name already exists and to choose a different name.

The only way I can figure you have two "xxxxxxxx.default" profile folders is that you renamed or deleted your profiles.ini file. That would create a new "default" profile but the old profile folder would still be there. Ref: http://kb.mozillazine.org/Creating_a_new_default_profile

MadsHaupt

I give you right that the picture might well be better.

So I'll try to take the picture again, and use image manipulation to all the text in the search box can be seen in the picture.

So we'll see if the picture does not improve. :)

this approach probably wouldn't work too well on touch devices with win10 though...

philipp said

this approach probably wouldn't work too well on touch devices with win10 though...

What instructions do you think would be better, philipp?