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With major resouces Firefox slows over a period of time rending web usage to a crawl.

Pridané

Running Debian Jessie (using lxde) on a system with major resources (well over 20 GB of RAM using 14 desktops).

I tend to have lots of windows and tabs open. Use different windows for different lines of inquiry and tabs are things that I found interesting. This means that I can have 10+ windows open and some windows might have 25+ tabs. I try (not terribly successfully) to prune tabs I'm not using but I definitely get tab (and less so but also window) accumulation.

Somehow Firefox gets to where my web access is conpromised where I'm getting access at a glacial pace, and as I'm on wireless its already more than somewhat slow(!!). So if I close all the open pdfs and reboot the system I will get much snappier web access but the closing of all the pdfs and then setting up the windows on the different desktops is a pain.

Are there settings besides the Preferences: Advanced: Network: Cached Web Content (which I increased to 'Limit cache to 1024 MB of space' which is as high as I can get it to go) that could be used to get the annoying problem to disappear? Perhaps Firefox is designed not to be used with larger numbers of windows with lots of tabs per window (If so let me know)? Just want this to work!

I stopped using Chrome because when my system went down there wasn't an easy way of finding all the tabs again, at the time, so when I found that Firefox was better at this I have moved the bulk of my browsing to Firefox.

I have checked with my ISP and it seems that the bulk of my issues are my browser. As Firefox is doing most everything else quite well it would be very good to get rid of this pesky problem (without the reboot cycle being needed). Just in case it makes a difference I was running Firefox 24. something up until today when I got totally frustrated and did a reboot cycle (and now have decent internet access).

TIA

Running Debian Jessie (using lxde) on a system with major resources (well over 20 GB of RAM using 14 desktops). I tend to have lots of windows and tabs open. Use different windows for different lines of inquiry and tabs are things that I found interesting. This means that I can have 10+ windows open and some windows might have 25+ tabs. I try (not terribly successfully) to prune tabs I'm not using but I definitely get tab (and less so but also window) accumulation. Somehow Firefox gets to where my web access is conpromised where I'm getting access at a glacial pace, and as I'm on wireless its already more than somewhat slow(!!). So if I close all the open pdfs and reboot the system I will get much snappier web access but the closing of all the pdfs and then setting up the windows on the different desktops is a pain. Are there settings besides the Preferences: Advanced: Network: Cached Web Content (which I increased to 'Limit cache to 1024 MB of space' which is as high as I can get it to go) that could be used to get the annoying problem to disappear? Perhaps Firefox is designed not to be used with larger numbers of windows with lots of tabs per window (If so let me know)? Just want this to work! I stopped using Chrome because when my system went down there wasn't an easy way of finding all the tabs again, at the time, so when I found that Firefox was better at this I have moved the bulk of my browsing to Firefox. I have checked with my ISP and it seems that the bulk of my issues are my browser. As Firefox is doing most everything else quite well it would be very good to get rid of this pesky problem (without the reboot cycle being needed). Just in case it makes a difference I was running Firefox 24. something up until today when I got totally frustrated and did a reboot cycle (and now have decent internet access). TIA

Ďalšie informácie o systéme

Nainštalované zásuvné moduly

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  • Shockwave Flash 11.2 r202

Aplikácie

  • Identifikácia prehliadača: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:31.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/31.0 Iceweasel/31.0

Viac informácií

guigs2
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There is a clear cache on close option in the Firefox Options/Preferences. Privacy > History > Use Custom Settings selected gets this box to appear: 'Clear History when Firefox Closes" but this would not remember tabs for next time.

Ideally that cache size is tested to provide enough space for decent performance. But as you say it gets slower as more items are opened.

Do you have offline web content enabled? This is the section right under where you set cached web content space.

There is a clear cache on close option in the Firefox Options/Preferences. Privacy > History > Use Custom Settings selected gets this box to appear: 'Clear History when Firefox Closes" but this would not remember tabs for next time. Ideally that cache size is tested to provide enough space for decent performance. But as you say it gets slower as more items are opened. Do you have offline web content enabled? This is the section right under where you set cached web content space.

Autor otázky

I reset my cache to the largest it would stay at, 1024 MB. The offline web content was at 11 or 12 MB. Still had dead dog internet performance. When when I reboot my system its almost snappy - for a while. Can't remember how long it was good the last time. I also upgraded to version 31 (from 24) if that makes a difference in the process of the reboot.

The problem is especially frustrating because there really is NO shortage of RAM!

I reset my cache to the largest it would stay at, 1024 MB. The offline web content was at 11 or 12 MB. Still had dead dog internet performance. When when I reboot my system its almost snappy - for a while. Can't remember how long it was good the last time. I also upgraded to version 31 (from 24) if that makes a difference in the process of the reboot. The problem is especially frustrating because there really is NO shortage of RAM!
guigs2
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I wonder if this is the network, does this happen on other browsers, or on other computers on the same network?

I also noticed that you are using Iceweseal, and found this: http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=111858 Have you tried disabling pipelining and IPV6?

I wonder if this is the network, does this happen on other browsers, or on other computers on the same network? I also noticed that you are using Iceweseal, and found this: [http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=111858] Have you tried disabling pipelining and IPV6?

Autor otázky

When I was having the issues the last time with FF Chrome was snappy. My ISP checked connections from their end and ping and throughput (up and down) were OK. I was unable to load the test from speedtest.net so I could not run the test from my end. Ping test from CLI was acceptable. Single other computer on network not having any issue. Router (run on DD-WRT) is set for IPv4.

You seem to have missed that I am running Debian Jessie. There are NO instructions for disabling IPv6 for Jessie although there are some for Wheezy although they are quite obsfucatory and quite difficult to follow. Did a Google search on 'how to disable pipelining on Debian Jessie with Iceweasel' and found zero useful in the first 3 pages of response.

Every signpost I run into points back to Firefox (Iceweasel). What makes this especially 'interesting' is that the same topic has emerged on my LUG from someone else and the 'me toos' are deafening.

How does one examine the code that is FF to determine where the issue might be? (That is what hasn't been investigated yet.)

When I was having the issues the last time with FF Chrome was snappy. My ISP checked connections from their end and ping and throughput (up and down) were OK. I was unable to load the test from speedtest.net so I could not run the test from my end. Ping test from CLI was acceptable. Single other computer on network not having any issue. Router (run on DD-WRT) is set for IPv4. You seem to have missed that I am running Debian Jessie. There are NO instructions for disabling IPv6 for Jessie although there are some for Wheezy although they are quite obsfucatory and quite difficult to follow. Did a Google search on 'how to disable pipelining on Debian Jessie with Iceweasel' and found zero useful in the first 3 pages of response. Every signpost I run into points back to Firefox (Iceweasel). What makes this especially 'interesting' is that the same topic has emerged on my LUG from someone else and the 'me toos' are deafening. How does one examine the code that is FF to determine where the issue might be? (That is what hasn't been investigated yet.)
guigs2
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Hi dabeegfarmer, So I asked an expert in this and I can only recommend that you try an official version of Debian Firefox. There have been weird issues that have been changed from the original Firefox that are not tracked and hard to find unfortunately.

Please let Firefox manage cache sizes, and try with a completely fresh profile.

Hi dabeegfarmer, So I asked an expert in this and I can only recommend that you try an official version of Debian Firefox. There have been weird issues that have been changed from the original Firefox that are not tracked and hard to find unfortunately. Please let Firefox manage cache sizes, and try with a completely fresh profile.

Autor otázky

Interesting - - - - a fresh profile - - - when I tried to do that I got an error message - - - which is linked to known bug in FF (and has been for quite some time) so I can't do that. I have tremendous piles of memory so leaving the cache size at some tiny number would seem quite counterproductive!

Would you tell me where I can look for RAM leakage from tabs? Would you tell me where an 'official version of Debian Firefox' is different from a version on Iceweasel updated from Debian mirrors?

Perhaps and best of all could you tell me why this problem is occuring? (I can send a number of other similar complaints from other members of the lugs I'm on if what it takes is a few hundred complaints.)

Interesting - - - - a fresh profile - - - when I tried to do that I got an error message - - - which is linked to known bug in FF (and has been for quite some time) so I can't do that. I have tremendous piles of memory so leaving the cache size at some tiny number would seem quite counterproductive! Would you tell me where I can look for RAM leakage from tabs? Would you tell me where an 'official version of Debian Firefox' is different from a version on Iceweasel updated from Debian mirrors? Perhaps and best of all could you tell me why this problem is occuring? (I can send a number of other similar complaints from other members of the lugs I'm on if what it takes is a few hundred complaints.)
FredMcD
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I do not know if this will help.

Fasterfox {web link} Fasterfox Gives performance & network tweaks for Firefox. Fasterfox makes your browsing so much faster!

I do not know if this will help. '''[https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/rsccmanfasterfox/ Fasterfox]''' {web link} Fasterfox Gives performance & network tweaks for Firefox. Fasterfox makes your browsing so much faster!

Autor otázky

I have spent a number of hours poking at the web using my friend mr duckduck and looking into various suggested corners on my system to try and narrow the area of difficulty that is causing my occasional (yet all too regular to date) web slowdown issue.

There is a lot of clarity that is injected into this discussion by reviewing my system's ram usage.

(For those coming late to the conversation I have what most would refer to as huge amounts of ram (north of 20 GiB). My work style is also such that I have a lot of windows (22 at present) open and tabs on each window ranging from a few to 20+.)

My system information tells me that at present 84% of my memory is cached. (I'm not sure how that compares to others but I would think that that is quite high.) A further breakdown in the numbers tells me that 54.8% is in what is termed 'Active (file)' and where I think the issue is 39.1% is in what is termed 'Inactive (file)'.

Somewhere between FF and the various subsidiary programs there is a tremendous wastage of ram cleanup scavenging and/or reliquishment (take your pick or any combination you wish).

What is being done by FF developers to reduce this inactive cached ram?

I have spent a number of hours poking at the web using my friend mr duckduck and looking into various suggested corners on my system to try and narrow the area of difficulty that is causing my occasional (yet all too regular to date) web slowdown issue. There is a lot of clarity that is injected into this discussion by reviewing my system's ram usage. (For those coming late to the conversation I have what most would refer to as huge amounts of ram (north of 20 GiB). My work style is also such that I have a lot of windows (22 at present) open and tabs on each window ranging from a few to 20+.) My system information tells me that at present 84% of my memory is cached. (I'm not sure how that compares to others but I would think that that is quite high.) A further breakdown in the numbers tells me that 54.8% is in what is termed 'Active (file)' and where I think the issue is 39.1% is in what is termed 'Inactive (file)'. Somewhere between FF and the various subsidiary programs there is a tremendous wastage of ram cleanup scavenging and/or reliquishment (take your pick or any combination you wish). What is being done by FF developers to reduce this inactive cached ram?

Autor otázky

I will declare this issue officially unsolved and unsolveable!

As it is a thread that I originated I believe that I have the right to declare its status.

Thanks to those who did give information or pointers for areas of search in the process.

If this level of committment to support is true in more of the wider range of issues Firefox is in serious danger of becoming even less responsive than its long term rival - - Internet Explorer and that's not a place I would want to be in.

Best of luck.

(Seems like its time for a new browser written for users by persons who will listen to their user community in my opinion.)

I will declare this issue officially unsolved and unsolveable! As it is a thread that I originated I believe that I have the right to declare its status. Thanks to those who did give information or pointers for areas of search in the process. If this level of committment to support is true in more of the wider range of issues Firefox is in serious danger of becoming even less responsive than its long term rival - - Internet Explorer and that's not a place I would want to be in. Best of luck. (Seems like its time for a new browser written for users by persons who will listen to their user community in my opinion.)