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Is This Part of FireFox Off Limits?

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  • 1 has this problem
  • 5 views
  • Last reply by jscher2000

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Today, I somewhat accidentally accessed a part of FireFox that I suspect is off limits to non-members.

STEPS

  1. I pressed and held cmd-option keys then hit the i key.
  2. Tapped the Network tab
  3. Refreshed the page
  4. These messages came up. I am not sure, but I suspect these links are off limits to non-members (to see the image I made , you have to click the link).

https://user-media-prod-cdn.itsre-sumo.mozilla.net/uploads/images/2020-06-27-12-42-27-182be0.png


5. clicked the link indicated which exposed the following restricted information. I suspect it is some form of computer code.

https://user-media-prod-cdn.itsre-sumo.mozilla.net/uploads/images/2020-06-27-12-44-37-c81e72.png

6. When this material appeared, I immediately unplugged my computer, to avoid detection by the authorities.

I repeated the steps, but took a few seconds to capture screen images so I could post them here.

I understand security practices might dictate that you share no knowledge on this topic, but if you can safely and legally explain in terms my child would understand, what I found hiding on my computer, I would be much obliged.

Attached screenshots

Modified by firefox195

Chosen solution

firefox195 said

cor-el said

You can browse the Firefox source code online via searchfox.org.
This also gives you better readability via syntax highlighting and explanatory comments and links to bug reports.

This keeps getting more weird. They take informatiion from a public website with no membership required to access, and yet they hide that same information on my computer.

The only thing I can figure is this fits somehow into the big tech censorship that is destroying our country.

The website lists the code that is in Firefox so people who work with browser code can easily access it. If you ever tried to search a string of text in a couple thousand files using Finder, I think you'll appreciate the benefit of that.

Your comments on "hidden" and "censorship" are like saying that since it never occurred to you to look around the corner before, what is around the corner was being hidden from you as part of a conspiracy. Really? Did you ever want to find Firefox's source code before today and not find the answer on where to see it? The point of licensing Firefox under the Mozilla Public License is to avoid secrets, and not to require any membership. You can read about the license here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozilla_Public_License This is all part of Mozilla's mission to support an open web: https://www.mozilla.org/mission/

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Hi firefox195, don't worry, anyone can use the Developer Tools, and we often suggest it as a way to check for errors loading/using a page (Console tab), poking around in the page code (Inspector tab), seeing what is and isn't loading into the page (Network tab), and so on.

In Firefox, a resource:// link usually refers to an internal part of the Firefox program stored in a compressed archive file in the program folder on your own computer. There's definitely no rule against viewing those files, please feel free to explore. Whether it helps in any way is a different question; it really depends what problem you are trying to solve.

And if you want to see some other interesting hidden stuff, you can type or paste about:about into the address bar and press Return to open a list of "about:" pages. Some of these pages only work when called from the menu or at a particular point in the loading process, some are a bit silly, but some show useful information you can't find anywhere else. The rabbit hole goes very deep. ;-)

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P.S. I'm not aware of members versus non-members. With open source software, we generally refer to a community of people who use the software and have the choice to become more involved in the project in various ways, such as volunteering to provide support.

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jscher2000 said

Hi firefox195, don't worry, anyone can use the Developer Tools, and we often suggest it as a way to check for errors loading/using a page (Console tab), poking around in the page code (Inspector tab), seeing what is and isn't loading into the page (Network tab), and so on. In Firefox, a resource:// link usually refers to an internal part of the Firefox program stored in a compressed archive file in the program folder on your own computer. There's definitely no rule against viewing those files, please feel free to explore. Whether it helps in any way is a different question; it really depends what problem you are trying to solve. And if you want to see some other interesting hidden stuff, you can type or paste about:about into the address bar and press Return to open a list of "about:" pages. Some of these pages only work when called from the menu or at a particular point in the loading process, some are a bit silly, but some show useful information you can't find anywhere else. The rabbit hole goes very deep. ;-)

Why has this material been hidden? If there really is no rule against reading these codes, what is the point in hiding it? Seems suspicious.

I don't think anyone should be allowed to hide things on a computer I own without my permission. I have never seen any terms of service saying they can hide things on MY computer. I am wondering is this is the result of a hack of brute force or other angle where bad guys can get things by me.

Modified by firefox195

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jscher2000 said

P.S. I'm not aware of members versus non-members. With open source software, we generally refer to a community of people who use the software and have the choice to become more involved in the project in various ways, such as volunteering to provide support.

I was assuming, which I know is unwise, because it makes an "ass" of you, which is 100% not my intention. Nothing hidden from members is common sense.

Is there a way to signup as a member?

Modified by firefox195

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You can browse the Firefox source code online via searchfox.org.
This also gives you better readability via syntax highlighting and explanatory comments and links to bug reports.

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cor-el said

You can browse the Firefox source code online via searchfox.org.
This also gives you better readability via syntax highlighting and explanatory comments and links to bug reports.

This keeps getting more weird. They take informatiion from a public website with no membership required to access, and yet they hide that same information on my computer.

The only thing I can figure is this fits somehow into the big tech censorship that is destroying our country.

Helpful?

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Parts of the Firefox code are written on programming languages like C++ and JavaScript and Rust and this code is publicly accessible because Firefox is open source software. The JavaScript parts are present as individual files and are compiled at runtime, that is why they are present in the Firefox installation folder. There is nothing mysterious about this.

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Chosen Solution

firefox195 said

cor-el said

You can browse the Firefox source code online via searchfox.org.
This also gives you better readability via syntax highlighting and explanatory comments and links to bug reports.

This keeps getting more weird. They take informatiion from a public website with no membership required to access, and yet they hide that same information on my computer.

The only thing I can figure is this fits somehow into the big tech censorship that is destroying our country.

The website lists the code that is in Firefox so people who work with browser code can easily access it. If you ever tried to search a string of text in a couple thousand files using Finder, I think you'll appreciate the benefit of that.

Your comments on "hidden" and "censorship" are like saying that since it never occurred to you to look around the corner before, what is around the corner was being hidden from you as part of a conspiracy. Really? Did you ever want to find Firefox's source code before today and not find the answer on where to see it? The point of licensing Firefox under the Mozilla Public License is to avoid secrets, and not to require any membership. You can read about the license here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozilla_Public_License This is all part of Mozilla's mission to support an open web: https://www.mozilla.org/mission/

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