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Firefox update channel is blocked at some public WiFi Providers. Like McDonalds.

Posted

By choosing to champion Privacy, and some Security features, Firefox has ticked off those corporations who believe my online activities should create an additional revenue stream for them by providing my online browsing to sell. AKA, many companies want to emulate Google, the information seller,.

Apparently Firefox responds to this by constantly trying to do Updates that are going to fail, which means my use of the Firefox Browser is constantly hanging, sticky and slowed.

Firefox developers need to understand the sequence of events, and not allow users of Firefox to be punished by a slow Firefox, because of Update failures.

This goes back to my other thing. If I log into the basic Firefox website, (They do not block the Firefox opening page, just the download link will not work) I expect to see by the download link the version of the latest Firefox, and its release date, as that is how I orientate how much difficulty I need to go through to get my Firefox updates.

If Firefox is going to support Privacy, Firefox should to expect to be hated, and blocked.

My computer is an Alienware 15 R2, I7, 16 GB RAM. Windows 10 Pro, which is fully updated, as McDS does not block M$ updates. (Microsoft also a company that also appears to have gone over to the dark side, and wants to spy on everything I do.

By choosing to champion Privacy, and some Security features, Firefox has ticked off those corporations who believe my online activities should create an additional revenue stream for them by providing my online browsing to sell. AKA, many companies want to emulate Google, the information seller,. Apparently Firefox responds to this by constantly trying to do Updates that are going to fail, which means my use of the Firefox Browser is constantly hanging, sticky and slowed. Firefox developers need to understand the sequence of events, and not allow users of Firefox to be punished by a slow Firefox, because of Update failures. This goes back to my other thing. If I log into the basic Firefox website, (They do not block the Firefox opening page, just the download link will not work) I expect to see by the download link the version of the latest Firefox, and its release date, as that is how I orientate how much difficulty I need to go through to get my Firefox updates. If Firefox is going to support Privacy, Firefox should to expect to be hated, and blocked. My computer is an Alienware 15 R2, I7, 16 GB RAM. Windows 10 Pro, which is fully updated, as McDS does not block M$ updates. (Microsoft also a company that also appears to have gone over to the dark side, and wants to spy on everything I do.

Additional System Details

Installed Plug-ins

  • Shockwave Flash 31.0 r0

Application

  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64; rv:63.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/63.0

More Information

FredMcD
  • Top 10 Contributor
4272 solutions 59920 answers

Have you tried downloading the full installer from

Download Firefox For All languages And Systems {web link}

Have you tried downloading the full installer from '''[http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/all/ Download Firefox For All languages And Systems]''' {web link}

Question owner

I have Firefox. This often does not function well as it is constantly trying to get Updates for itself.

The full download is blocked as well. IP addresses are blocked.

I start a VPN, then let Firefox Update itself. Then speed of browser action returns.

I have Firefox. This often does not function well as it is constantly trying to get Updates for itself. The full download is blocked as well. IP addresses are blocked. I start a VPN, then let Firefox Update itself. Then speed of browser action returns.
jscher2000
  • Top 10 Contributor
8797 solutions 71955 answers

crystal-clear said

This goes back to my other thing. If I log into the basic Firefox website, (They do not block the Firefox opening page, just the download link will not work) I expect to see by the download link the version of the latest Firefox, and its release date, as that is how I orientate how much difficulty I need to go through to get my Firefox updates.

I've never tried the wi-fi at McDonald's, so I don't know how it works there. What happens when you try to load the page? Do you get a specific error message you could copy/paste into a reply here?

''crystal-clear [[#question-1242242|said]]'' <blockquote>This goes back to my other thing. If I log into the basic Firefox website, (They do not block the Firefox opening page, just the download link will not work) I expect to see by the download link the version of the latest Firefox, and its release date, as that is how I orientate how much difficulty I need to go through to get my Firefox updates. </blockquote> I've never tried the wi-fi at McDonald's, so I don't know how it works there. What happens when you try to load the page? Do you get a specific error message you could copy/paste into a reply here?
cor-el
  • Top 10 Contributor
  • Moderator
17583 solutions 159079 answers

See also the Browser Console.

See also the Browser Console. *"3-bar" menu button or Tools -> Web Developer *https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/Tools/Browser_Console

Question owner

Thanks to all of you for reading my post, I don't seem to have explained what I think is happening very well.

I don't need to find a tab setting of some kind to make the browser perform as it can. I can do that by turning on a VPN until the update occurs, then the speed/quickness of Firefox returns. Even if I turn off the VPN, which can bring its own slowness to my internet connection, Firefox returns to its quick self. It is the constant attempt to do updates, which will fail due to the block which slows Firefox.

Occasional computer users will not realize, not be willing to do that. They will notice over a period of time that Firefox is habitually slothful, hanging and such. Thereby, Firefox will lose users.

I would be pretty sure the public WiFi connections will not block Edge. Public WiFi connections are opposed to the privacy efforts of Firefox, hence the block.

Perhaps there is a group of brainy people at Firefox thinking on this. Perhaps they are considering implementing some kind of Free VPN inside the native build of Firefox. Of course, the public WiFi connection, if it identifies the VPN IP, they will block it. I assume they will not block the VPN I use, as it is a pay for product, and that is not a battle those who provide the free WiFi wants against a VPN. Blocks are focused against Free Software, in actuality, I think against Privacy on the internet.

Thanks to all of you for reading my post, I don't seem to have explained what I think is happening very well. I don't need to find a tab setting of some kind to make the browser perform as it can. I can do that by turning on a VPN until the update occurs, then the speed/quickness of Firefox returns. Even if I turn off the VPN, which can bring its own slowness to my internet connection, Firefox returns to its quick self. It is the constant attempt to do updates, which will fail due to the block which slows Firefox. Occasional computer users will not realize, not be willing to do that. They will notice over a period of time that Firefox is habitually slothful, hanging and such. Thereby, Firefox will lose users. I would be pretty sure the public WiFi connections will not block Edge. Public WiFi connections are opposed to the privacy efforts of Firefox, hence the block. Perhaps there is a group of brainy people at Firefox thinking on this. Perhaps they are considering implementing some kind of Free VPN inside the native build of Firefox. Of course, the public WiFi connection, if it identifies the VPN IP, they will block it. I assume they will not block the VPN I use, as it is a pay for product, and that is not a battle those who provide the free WiFi wants against a VPN. Blocks are focused against Free Software, in actuality, I think against Privacy on the internet.

Modified by crystal-clear

WestEnd 60 solutions 5387 answers

What a private business does on their free wifi that you use is their policy and firefox End user forum can't help with that problem. There is no good VPN solution and trying to have firefox make one is a long shot at best. You could also contact their corporate headquarters and ask their support is this something they are doing. Free wifi isn't "Free sense" as one thinks so let's put that notion to rest here. The policy is their policy to do as they please so one day it could be unless your a paying customer you don't get access to our wifi and this has become part of the norm now.

What a private business does on their free wifi that you use is their policy and firefox End user forum can't help with that problem. There is no good VPN solution and trying to have firefox make one is a long shot at best. You could also contact their corporate headquarters and ask their support is this something they are doing. Free wifi isn't "Free sense" as one thinks so let's put that notion to rest here. The policy is their policy to do as they please so one day it could be unless your a paying customer you don't get access to our wifi and this has become part of the norm now.

Question owner

West End, what you are saying is that WiFi is not governed by rules of being a Utility. It is like the power company denying me power because I how I use their power.

You are also turning your back on the concept that my private business be laid open to the Spying of places like Google. Part of why some of us use Firefox is that it offers us the option to keep our business private.

The position of what provider can and not do, is more similar to the policies of countries like Iran, Red China, North Korea.

West End, what you are saying is that WiFi is not governed by rules of being a Utility. It is like the power company denying me power because I how I use their power. You are also turning your back on the concept that my private business be laid open to the Spying of places like Google. Part of why some of us use Firefox is that it offers us the option to keep our business private. The position of what provider can and not do, is more similar to the policies of countries like Iran, Red China, North Korea.

Question owner

I should say, at one time I would have agreed with all that has been said; "that a private company can set the rules."

I should say, at one time I would have agreed with all that has been said; "that a private company can set the rules."