X
Tap here to go to the mobile version of the site.

Support Forum

How to stop updates

Posted

I'm tired of being pestered by FF to update. If I wanted to update, I would. I don't and I'm not driven by the need to constantly update something that it running stable. as-is How do I turn this off w/o being an IT pro?

I'm tired of being pestered by FF to update. If I wanted to update, I would. I don't and I'm not driven by the need to constantly update something that it running stable. as-is How do I turn this off w/o being an IT pro?
Quote

Additional System Details

Installed Plug-ins

  • Shockwave Flash 29.0 r0

Application

  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:66.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/66.0

More Information

Wesley Branton
  • Top 10 Contributor
622 solutions 5155 answers

Disabling updates is never recommended because it leaves you exposed to several security and privacy holes that have been well documented. Because these holes are well documented, the risk increases as attackers target users who are not running patched versions.

If you want the Firefox updates not to be installed automatically, you can select the Check for updates but let you choose to install them option in the Firefox settings.

If you really wanted to, it is possible to completely disable updates, although it's really only intended for business networks that are going to update Firefox using another method other than the Firefox updating service. You would control this either using Windows Group Policies or a policies.json file.

Both methods do require an advanced computer knowledge because, again, they are intended for IT administrators not basic Firefox users.

Hope this helps.

Disabling updates is never recommended because it leaves you exposed to several security and privacy holes that have been well documented. Because these holes are well documented, the risk increases as attackers target users who are not running patched versions. If you want the Firefox updates not to be installed automatically, you can select the '''Check for updates but let you choose to install them''' option in the Firefox settings. If you really wanted to, it is possible to completely disable updates, although it's really only intended for business networks that are going to update Firefox using another method other than the Firefox updating service. You would control this either using [[Customizing Firefox Using Group Policy (Windows)|Windows Group Policies]] or [[Customizing Firefox Using policies.json|a policies.json file]]. Both methods do require an advanced computer knowledge because, again, they are intended for IT administrators not basic Firefox users. Hope this helps.
Was this helpful to you? 1
Quote

Question owner

It didn't help. All of that I already knew. I do not wish to be pestered by FF to update, which used to be an option, but has been removed. Bring it back.

It didn't help. All of that I already knew. I do not wish to be pestered by FF to update, which used to be an option, but has been removed. Bring it back.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Wesley Branton
  • Top 10 Contributor
622 solutions 5155 answers

It was taken away because of the severe security risk that it poses and it's not a feature that will be added back to Firefox. Largely, the Firefox updates are done in the background anyway with minimal user interaction required.

The steps for the Windows Group Policy or policies.json file will disable updates for Firefox, but as I already said, it's not recommended for standard users.

It was taken away because of the severe security risk that it poses and it's not a feature that will be added back to Firefox. Largely, the Firefox updates are done in the background anyway with minimal user interaction required. The steps for the Windows Group Policy or policies.json file will disable updates for Firefox, but as I already said, '''<u>it's not recommended for standard users</u>'''.
Was this helpful to you? 1
Quote

Question owner

Except that the last time it updated it removed all of my extensions, which cost me a bunch of time. So it is not a simple thing that happens in the background.

I really resent the "nanny-ism" that coding like this is.

Except that the last time it updated it removed all of my extensions, which cost me a bunch of time. So it is not a simple thing that happens in the background. I really resent the "nanny-ism" that coding like this is.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Wesley Branton
  • Top 10 Contributor
622 solutions 5155 answers

Helpful Reply

Although it's not hugely common for users to experience issues like that when updating, anything can happen. However, reaching out to the support community if a situation like that occurs, will usually result in a solution to fix the issue.

While I don't believe that it's likely that the Firefox developers will restore this feature to Firefox due to the security issues that it presents, you are welcome to submit your feedback. You can go to the Firefox Help menu and select Submit Feedback... or use this link.

Although it's not hugely common for users to experience issues like that when updating, anything can happen. However, reaching out to the support community if a situation like that occurs, will usually result in a solution to fix the issue. While I don't believe that it's likely that the Firefox developers will restore this feature to Firefox due to the security issues that it presents, you are welcome to submit your feedback. You can go to the Firefox ''Help'' menu and select ''Submit Feedback...'' or use [https://qsurvey.mozilla.com/s3/FirefoxInput/ this link].
Was this helpful to you? 1
Quote
FredMcD
  • Top 10 Contributor
4261 solutions 59654 answers

Back up and restore information in Firefox profiles.{web link} I use an add-on that makes backups of my user profile, Just In Case. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the current Firefox.

Every now and then, open the profile folder and create a copy of the current profile as is to another location on your hard drive. This way you will have a backup.

If you do this each day, you will not lose much data. This should be done with Firefox Closed.

Note: In case you need to restore from these backups, you may need to overwrite old or corrupted files.

[[Back up and restore information in Firefox profiles]].{web link} I use an add-on that makes backups of my user profile, Just In Case. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the current Firefox. Every now and then, open the profile folder and create a '''copy''' of the current profile '''as is''' to another location on your hard drive. This way you will have a backup. If you do this each day, you will not lose much data. This should be done with '''Firefox Closed. ''' Note: In case you need to restore from these backups, you may need to overwrite old or corrupted files.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
McCoy
  • Top 10 Contributor
545 solutions 5143 answers

ntsqd said

Except that the last time it updated it removed all of my extensions, which cost me a bunch of time.

Hello ntsqd,

Could it be that you're referring to this unfortunate "incident" :

https://blog.mozilla.org/addons/2019/05/04/update-regarding-add-ons-in-firefox/comment-page-5/  ?

''ntsqd [[#answer-1227847|said]]'' <blockquote> Except that the last time it updated it removed all of my extensions, which cost me a bunch of time. </blockquote> Hello ntsqd, Could it be that you're referring to this unfortunate "incident" : https://blog.mozilla.org/addons/2019/05/04/update-regarding-add-ons-in-firefox/comment-page-5/ ?
Was this helpful to you?
Quote

Question owner

That may have been it, I do not know. I'm not even sure how that update occurred when I don't recall instigating it.

I just this annoying pop-up to stop. It may be a childish response, but the more it badgers me, the less I'm likely to do what it wants.

That may have been it, I do not know. I'm not even sure how that update occurred when I don't recall instigating it. I just this annoying pop-up to stop. It may be a childish response, but the more it badgers me, the less I'm likely to do what it wants.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
cor-el
  • Top 10 Contributor
  • Moderator
17541 solutions 158604 answers

There has been an unfortunate incident a few weeks ago with an intermediate certificate that had expired recently and this certificate was used to verify the signatures of extensions hosted on the Add-ons website. This expired intermediate certificate caused Firefox to distrust and disable all installed extensions. This issue has been fixed in Firefox 66.0.5 and later (67.0.1 is current).

See also:

There has been an unfortunate incident a few weeks ago with an intermediate certificate that had expired recently and this certificate was used to verify the signatures of extensions hosted on the Add-ons website. This expired intermediate certificate caused Firefox to distrust and disable all installed extensions. This issue has been fixed in Firefox 66.0.5 and later (67.0.1 is current). *https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/update-firefox-latest-version See also: *https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/add-ons-disabled-or-fail-to-install-firefox
Was this helpful to you? 0
Quote

Question owner

The issue here is not the past problem with add-ons. The problem is annoying update reminders. Make them stop.

The issue here is not the past problem with add-ons. The problem is annoying update reminders. Make them stop.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Tyler Downer
  • Top 25 Contributor
  • Moderator
1535 solutions 10714 answers

The easiest way to get rid of the update reminders is to update. The current version of Firefox is 67.0.1. If you update, then the reminders will go away. All your add-ons will work, you'll be more secure, and bonus, 67 includes some dramatic speed improvements.

Firefox usually only updates every 4-6 weeks or so. Sometimes there are additional updates if a major issue is found, but that doesn't happen regularly.

The easiest way to get rid of the update reminders is to update. The current version of Firefox is 67.0.1. If you update, then the reminders will go away. All your add-ons will work, you'll be more secure, and bonus, 67 includes some dramatic speed improvements. Firefox usually only updates every 4-6 weeks or so. Sometimes there are additional updates if a major issue is found, but that doesn't happen regularly.
Was this helpful to you? 1
Quote

Question owner

Clearly what I want doesn't matter. I'll look for a different browser.

Clearly what I want doesn't matter. I'll look for a different browser.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Tyler Downer
  • Top 25 Contributor
  • Moderator
1535 solutions 10714 answers

Amy other browser also will have updates. Browsers don't stand still, they are a massive Target for attack by bad actors, and as a consequence continually have security holes that need to be patched. It's just like your operating system, it has updates and needs to be continually updated

Amy other browser also will have updates. Browsers don't stand still, they are a massive Target for attack by bad actors, and as a consequence continually have security holes that need to be patched. It's just like your operating system, it has updates and needs to be continually updated
Was this helpful to you? 0
Quote
Wesley Branton
  • Top 10 Contributor
622 solutions 5155 answers

Like Tyler said, there is no secure internet browser that doesn't have updates. Google Chrome has forced automatic updates. Brave has forced updates. Even Internet Explorer/Microsoft Edge get regular updates through Microsoft updates.

But as I've already said in my very first reply to you, I've already given you the option to disable updates in Firefox if you absolutely want to. But it's something that you will be doing at your own risk.

Just as an example of the risk that you are taking by not updating, Firefox 67.0 included 21 security patches, 2 of which were labelled critical. This is the same story for pretty much every update. So if you fall behind just 5 updates, you are looking at more than 100 security holes that you haven't fixed. That's more than 100 ways that an attacker can quite easily exploit your browser.

If you want to take that risk, that's entirely up to you. Simply implement a Windows Group Policy or policies.json, like I already mentioned in my first contact with you.

Like Tyler said, there is no secure internet browser that doesn't have updates. Google Chrome has forced automatic updates. Brave has forced updates. Even Internet Explorer/Microsoft Edge get regular updates through Microsoft updates. But as I've already said in my very first reply to you, I've already given you the option to disable updates in Firefox if you absolutely want to. But it's something that you will be doing '''at your own risk'''. Just as an example of the risk that you are taking by not updating, Firefox 67.0 included 21 security patches, 2 of which were labelled critical. This is the same story for pretty much every update. So if you fall behind just 5 updates, you are looking at more than 100 security holes that you haven't fixed. That's more than 100 ways that an attacker can quite easily exploit your browser. If you want to take that risk, that's entirely up to you. Simply implement a Windows Group Policy or policies.json, like I already mentioned in my first contact with you.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote

Question owner

It is NOT the updates, it is being BULLIED into updating that I'm objecting to. I will update on MY schedule, not someone else's.

As to my OS, it doesn't update unless I tell it to. Period.

The stance that "it's for your own good" has been used by tyrannies and dictatorships from the beginning of time. Still doesn't make right or justifiable.

Done here.

It is NOT the updates, it is being BULLIED into updating that I'm objecting to. I will update on MY schedule, not someone else's. As to my OS, it doesn't update unless I tell it to. Period. The stance that "it's for your own good" has been used by tyrannies and dictatorships from the beginning of time. Still doesn't make right or justifiable. Done here.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Wesley Branton
  • Top 10 Contributor
622 solutions 5155 answers

That's precisely what the Check for updates but let you choose to install them option, which I already suggested, is for. Firefox will still check to see if there are updates, but then you will get to install them when you want to.

That's precisely what the '''Check for updates but let you choose to install them''' option, which I already suggested, is for. Firefox will still check to see if there are updates, but then you will get to install them when ''you'' want to.
Was this helpful to you? 0
Quote

Question owner

Wesley Branton said

...... But as I've already said in my very first reply to you, I've already given you the option to disable updates in Firefox if you absolutely want to. But it's something that you will be doing at your own risk.

This is only useful to someone well versed in programming. For mere users its not obvious what the syntax needs to be nor how to implement it.

Previous versions have a simple box/circle to check depending on the USER's preference. Note the emphasis on USER. Not the supplier, not the coder, THE USER.

I fully accept the consequences of my own actions. What I don't accept is being told "its for my good" when it clearly is in contradiction with my goals. The condescending "The easiest way to get rid of the update reminders is to update." is particularly galling when the whole POINT was to not be pestered to update OR to be forced into updating.

Who here can offer a copy/paste script for the the text in the policies.json file should be?

EDIT: I reloaded FF 65 and it popped up a note saying "Updates have been disabled by the SysAdmin". Which is curious because I am the SysAdmin and I didn't do anything that I know of to affect this. If this results in no pestering to update then I'l be happy with that.

''Wesley Branton [[#answer-1228012|said]]'' <blockquote> ...... But as I've already said in my very first reply to you, I've already given you the option to disable updates in Firefox if you absolutely want to. But it's something that you will be doing '''at your own risk'''. </blockquote> This is only useful to someone well versed in programming. For mere users its not obvious what the syntax needs to be nor how to implement it. Previous versions have a simple box/circle to check depending on the USER's preference. Note the emphasis on USER. Not the supplier, not the coder, THE USER. I fully accept the consequences of my own actions. What I don't accept is being told "its for my good" when it clearly is in contradiction with my goals. The condescending "The easiest way to get rid of the update reminders is to update." is particularly galling when the whole POINT was to not be pestered to update OR to be forced into updating. Who here can offer a copy/paste script for the the text in the policies.json file should be? EDIT: I reloaded FF 65 and it popped up a note saying "Updates have been disabled by the SysAdmin". Which is curious because I am the SysAdmin and I didn't do anything that I know of to affect this. If this results in no pestering to update then I'l be happy with that.

Modified by ntsqd

Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Wesley Branton
  • Top 10 Contributor
622 solutions 5155 answers

ntsqd said

Who here can offer a copy/paste script for the the text in the policies.json file should be?

The page I linked for you already has the complete code for disabling updates.

{
  "policies": {
    "DisableAppUpdate": true | false
  }
}
''ntsqd [[#answer-1233992|said]]'' <blockquote>Who here can offer a copy/paste script for the the text in the policies.json file should be?</blockquote> The page I linked for you already has the complete code for disabling updates. <pre><nowiki>{ "policies": { "DisableAppUpdate": true | false } }</nowiki></pre>
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
isacimages 0 solutions 1 answers

I'm in the same position as rtnsq. I've rolled back from 68 to 67 because FF withdrew the ability to drag & drop to the desktop, which I use all the time for my graphics and photography editing. Version 67 has this drag & drop and 68 does not. Every time I start FF I get the annoying update popup. I don't care which browser I use as long as it allows drag & drop. I will probably start using another browser.

I'm in the same position as rtnsq. I've rolled back from 68 to 67 because FF withdrew the ability to drag & drop to the desktop, which I use all the time for my graphics and photography editing. Version 67 has this drag & drop and 68 does not. Every time I start FF I get the annoying update popup. I don't care which browser I use as long as it allows drag & drop. I will probably start using another browser.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
McCoy
  • Top 10 Contributor
545 solutions 5143 answers

isacimages said

Every time I start FF I get the annoying update popup.

Hello isacimages,

To stop update notifications, would you please do this :

Type in the address bar about:config and press Enter (pormise to be careful, if asked)

Type in the search bar app.update

Look for the preference app.update.doorhanger

and set its value to false

Then close and restart Firefox.

''isacimages [[#answer-1246387|said]]'' <blockquote> Every time I start FF I get the annoying update popup. </blockquote> Hello isacimages, To stop update notifications, would you please do this : Type in the address bar '''about:config''' and press Enter (pormise to be careful, if asked) Type in the search bar '''app.update''' Look for the preference '''app.update.doorhanger''' and set its value to '''false''' Then close and restart Firefox.
Was this helpful to you?
Quote
Ask a question

You must log in to your account to reply to posts. Please start a new question, if you do not have an account yet.