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I like the new rapid release, but I don't like how it's done.

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Hello Firefox users.

I have a suggestion for your rapid release program. Ever since Firefox 2, I have been a loyal fan. Each update had a meaning and a purpose.

Ever since Firefox 5, each update makes slight improvements to technologies that aren't even used by the majority of the web. I'm not criticizing the updates you give, but instead how they are delivered.

Since Firefox 5, every 6~ weeks, a new firefox is released with a new version number. They offer little new.

My suggestion is to stop increasing the main version number.

When you go to your Firefox version, it says Firefox 7.0.1. At the this rate, the second digit of the firefox version will likely NEVER be used. How can they give a decent update in less than 6 weeks? That wont happen, they will include it in the next release.

Instead I propose a slightly revised plan. Instead of increasing the main version number, increase the second version number.

For example; Firefox 8 is coming out very soon, instead of releasing it as Firefox 8, instead release it as 7.1. Firefox 9 can be released as 7.2. Firefox 10 can be released as 7.3, and etc.

Based on the old plan (before rapid release) a MAJOR update would be released very rarely. Example:

Firefox 2.0 released October 24th, 2006 Firefox 3.0 released June 17, 2008

That's about 1 3/4 years later! In that same time span, Firefox will have increased 15 version numbers! That means we will be at version 22 in 1 3/4 years!

I am in no way suggesting reverting. The new rapid release helps get new technologies out there.

Here is my plan:

  • Firefox 7.1 (8) Week #6
  • Firefox 7.2 (9) Week #12
  • Firefox 7.3 (10) Week #18
  • Firefox 7.4 (11) Week #24
  • Firefox 7.5 (12) Week #30
  • Firefox 7.6 (13) Week #36
  • Firefox 7.7 (14) Week #42
  • Firefox 7.8 (15) Week #48
  • Firefox 8.0 (16) Week #54

The six week plan with incremental updates will give us Version 8 on Week 54, almost one year after Version 7. This will allow for technologies to be released without undermining the huge progress that was made from version Firefox 1.0 - 4.0.

This will stop the large amount of complaints that Firefox has been receiving.

The rapid release that Chrome uses works well because they started with it, and they are used to it.

I hope Firefox will consider this plan instead of the old one. I cannot see any flaws in it, but if you can, please point them out, as I would like to either rebuttal them, or agree with them.

Hello Firefox users. I have a suggestion for your rapid release program. Ever since Firefox 2, I have been a loyal fan. Each update had a meaning and a purpose. Ever since Firefox 5, each update makes slight improvements to technologies that aren't even used by the majority of the web. I'm not criticizing the updates you give, but instead how they are delivered. Since Firefox 5, every 6~ weeks, a new firefox is released with a new version number. They offer little new. My suggestion is to stop increasing the main version number. When you go to your Firefox version, it says Firefox 7.0.1. At the this rate, the second digit of the firefox version will likely NEVER be used. How can they give a decent update in less than 6 weeks? That wont happen, they will include it in the next release. Instead I propose a slightly revised plan. Instead of increasing the main version number, increase the second version number. For example; Firefox 8 is coming out very soon, instead of releasing it as Firefox 8, instead release it as 7.1. Firefox 9 can be released as 7.2. Firefox 10 can be released as 7.3, and etc. Based on the old plan (before rapid release) a MAJOR update would be released very rarely. Example: Firefox 2.0 released October 24th, 2006 Firefox 3.0 released June 17, 2008 That's about '''1 3/4 years later'''! In that same time span, Firefox will have increased 15 version numbers! That means '''we will be at version 22 in 1 3/4 years'''! I am in no way suggesting reverting. The new rapid release helps get new technologies out there. Here is my plan: * Firefox 7.1 (8) Week #6 * Firefox 7.2 (9) Week #12 * Firefox 7.3 (10) Week #18 * Firefox 7.4 (11) Week #24 * Firefox 7.5 (12) Week #30 * Firefox 7.6 (13) Week #36 * Firefox 7.7 (14) Week #42 * Firefox 7.8 (15) Week #48 * '''Firefox 8.0 (16) Week #54''' The six week plan with incremental updates will give us Version 8 on Week 54, almost one year after Version 7. This will allow for technologies to be released without undermining the huge progress that was made from version Firefox 1.0 - 4.0. This will stop the large amount of complaints that Firefox has been receiving. The rapid release that Chrome uses works well because they started with it, and they are used to it. I hope Firefox will consider this plan instead of the old one. I cannot see any flaws in it, but if you can, '''please''' point them out, as I would like to either rebuttal them, or agree with them.

Modified by Trew

All Replies (4)

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I'm not a fan of the rapid release schedule. IMO, Mozilla should have gradually eased into the rapid schedule in stages, with like 2 at 6 month intervals, then 2 at 3 month intervals, before proceeding with the 6 week interval.

With all due respect, your proposal makes as little sense as what Mozilla is doing now. How different is a .1 change vs a 1.0 increase? Either change can break add-on compatibility which seems to be the largest complaint about the rapid release scheme. That might have gotten Firefox users used to the change to a Chrome like schedule gradually over a year and a half.

Have you even read about what was fixed in Firefox 7?
http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/7.0/releasenotes/buglist.html
With that number of Bug fixes it's hard to say that very little was changed in Firefox 7.

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Actually, with that number of bug fixes, it is extremely easy to say that it "offers little new," which is the original point. Bug fixes should result in a MINOR update. A major release should actually have new features.

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They do, just may not seem to be as obvious or as big as the the Firefox 4.0 release was in abundance of features.

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Minor / Major updates don't exist any longer. There are updates and "chemspill" patch versions - like 9.0.1 - to fix specific problems that weren't caught in Beta testing, or to fix security issues which can't wait for the next update.