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scam firefox post

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This shows up on my wife's pc

This shows up on my wife's pc

Chosen solution

Hi, is she getting a big page suggesting there is a virus or some other reason to call a support company, sometimes pretending to be Microsoft, sometimes with a recorded voice? Firefox has a phishing and malware protection feature, but scammers keep creating new sites, so it is difficult to get the list updated before users are sent to bad sites.

There are a few common patterns to these annoying pages, and these are some techniques for closing them without having to take drastic measures.

The "key" (ha ha) is the keyboard shortcut for closing the current tab, which is Ctrl+w (or on Mac, Cmd+w). Try it after each action to see whether it is available yet.

(1) Large alert dialog (lots of text)

If you cancel this dialog, it may reappear. After two or three appearances, Firefox should add a checkbox at the bottom of the dialog to stop the site from showing more alerts. Check that box and click OK to block further dialogs.

(2) Authentication dialog (asks for username and password)

If you cancel this dialog, the page may reload and immediately show it again. Pressing the Esc key numerous times in a row can cancel the reload as well as the dialog.

(3) Reacting to mouse movement

Some pages have a script that detects when you are moving the mouse pointer up toward the tab bar and takes action to show another dialog, or moves to full screen view to hide the toolbar area. On these pages, the keyboard shortcut is essential.

Hopefully this will let you close problem pages without having to "kill" Firefox in the Windows Task Manager. (I don't recommend using that method because the tab will come back during automatic crash recovery anyway.)


Often these scam pages are promoted through ad networks. As a defensive measure, you could consider using an add-on that is effective at blocking ads, such as:

https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/ublock-origin/

As with any content blocker, this will cause problems on some sites, so keep an eye on its toolbar button in case you need to make an exception to get a page to load properly.

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  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Android 9; Mobile; rv:67.0) Gecko/67.0 Firefox/67.0

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Question owner

Sorry. Tried to post screenshot but failed. I will try again.

Sorry. Tried to post screenshot but failed. I will try again.
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FredMcD
  • Top 10 Contributor
4194 solutions 58544 answers

Please see How do I create a screenshot of my problem?

Once you've done this, attach the saved screenshot file to your forum post by clicking the Browse... button below the Post your reply box. This will help us to visualize the problem.

Thank you!

Please see [[How do I create a screenshot of my problem?]] Once you've done this, attach the saved screenshot file to your forum post by clicking the '''Browse...''' button below the ''Post your reply'' box. This will help us to visualize the problem. Thank you!
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jscher2000
  • Top 10 Contributor
8583 solutions 70214 answers

Chosen Solution

Hi, is she getting a big page suggesting there is a virus or some other reason to call a support company, sometimes pretending to be Microsoft, sometimes with a recorded voice? Firefox has a phishing and malware protection feature, but scammers keep creating new sites, so it is difficult to get the list updated before users are sent to bad sites.

There are a few common patterns to these annoying pages, and these are some techniques for closing them without having to take drastic measures.

The "key" (ha ha) is the keyboard shortcut for closing the current tab, which is Ctrl+w (or on Mac, Cmd+w). Try it after each action to see whether it is available yet.

(1) Large alert dialog (lots of text)

If you cancel this dialog, it may reappear. After two or three appearances, Firefox should add a checkbox at the bottom of the dialog to stop the site from showing more alerts. Check that box and click OK to block further dialogs.

(2) Authentication dialog (asks for username and password)

If you cancel this dialog, the page may reload and immediately show it again. Pressing the Esc key numerous times in a row can cancel the reload as well as the dialog.

(3) Reacting to mouse movement

Some pages have a script that detects when you are moving the mouse pointer up toward the tab bar and takes action to show another dialog, or moves to full screen view to hide the toolbar area. On these pages, the keyboard shortcut is essential.

Hopefully this will let you close problem pages without having to "kill" Firefox in the Windows Task Manager. (I don't recommend using that method because the tab will come back during automatic crash recovery anyway.)


Often these scam pages are promoted through ad networks. As a defensive measure, you could consider using an add-on that is effective at blocking ads, such as:

https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/ublock-origin/

As with any content blocker, this will cause problems on some sites, so keep an eye on its toolbar button in case you need to make an exception to get a page to load properly.

Hi, is she getting a big page suggesting there is a virus or some other reason to call a support company, sometimes pretending to be Microsoft, sometimes with a recorded voice? Firefox has a phishing and malware protection feature, but scammers keep creating new sites, so it is difficult to get the list updated before users are sent to bad sites. There are a few common patterns to these annoying pages, and these are some techniques for closing them without having to take drastic measures. The "key" (ha ha) is the keyboard shortcut for closing the current tab, which is Ctrl+w (or on Mac, Cmd+w). Try it after each action to see whether it is available yet. (1) Large alert dialog (lots of text) If you cancel this dialog, it may reappear. After two or three appearances, Firefox should add a checkbox at the bottom of the dialog to stop the site from showing more alerts. Check that box and click OK to block further dialogs. (2) Authentication dialog (asks for username and password) If you cancel this dialog, the page may reload and immediately show it again. Pressing the Esc key numerous times in a row can cancel the reload as well as the dialog. (3) Reacting to mouse movement Some pages have a script that detects when you are moving the mouse pointer up toward the tab bar and takes action to show another dialog, or moves to full screen view to hide the toolbar area. On these pages, the keyboard shortcut is essential. Hopefully this will let you close problem pages without having to "kill" Firefox in the Windows Task Manager. (I don't recommend using that method because the tab will come back during automatic crash recovery anyway.) ---- Often these scam pages are promoted through ad networks. As a defensive measure, you could consider using an add-on that is effective at blocking ads, such as: https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/ublock-origin/ As with any content blocker, this will cause problems on some sites, so keep an eye on its toolbar button in case you need to make an exception to get a page to load properly.
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