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Why are Firefox updates so annoying?

Posted

Chrome's updates are perfect because you forget about them, but know that it's always up-to-date. I turned off Firefox automatic updates because:

1. Whenever there's an update I have to wait 10 seconds just to open my browser. Many times when I'm in a rush and I need to open Firefox quickly, I get angry that I have to wait for it to install updates.

2. I hate having to remove the unresponsive Firefox taskbar icon, go into my start menu, find Firefox, and pin it back on my taskbar EVERY time there's an update. If I right-click Firefox on the taskbar, it says Firefox (25) because of all the times I had to do this.

However, with automatic updates off, there is always an update pop-up on the top-right for me to manually update, but I don't want to update because of the second reason mentioned above. So no matter what I do, I always have to deal with the idea of an update. This is poor design, and it drives me nuts sometimes.

Is there any way to fix this?

Chrome's updates are perfect because you forget about them, but know that it's always up-to-date. I turned off Firefox automatic updates because: 1. Whenever there's an update I have to wait 10 seconds just to open my browser. Many times when I'm in a rush and I need to open Firefox quickly, I get angry that I have to wait for it to install updates. 2. I hate having to remove the unresponsive Firefox taskbar icon, go into my start menu, find Firefox, and pin it back on my taskbar EVERY time there's an update. If I right-click Firefox on the taskbar, it says Firefox (25) because of all the times I had to do this. However, with automatic updates off, there is always an update pop-up on the top-right for me to manually update, but I don't want to update because of the second reason mentioned above. So no matter what I do, I always have to deal with the idea of an update. This is poor design, and it drives me nuts sometimes. Is there any way to fix this?

Chosen solution

You appear to be using the Firefox 60.0b# builds (60.0b10 is current) instead of the 59.0.2 Release.

Beta channel builds can get say nine to fourteen builds on average for a version.

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  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64; rv:60.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/60.0

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James
  • Moderator
1594 solutions 11232 answers

Chosen Solution

You appear to be using the Firefox 60.0b# builds (60.0b10 is current) instead of the 59.0.2 Release.

Beta channel builds can get say nine to fourteen builds on average for a version.

You appear to be using the Firefox 60.0b# builds (60.0'''b10''' is current) instead of the [https://www.mozilla.org/firefox/all/ 59.0.2 Release]. Beta channel builds can get say nine to fourteen builds on average for a version.
cor-el
  • Top 10 Contributor
  • Moderator
17418 solutions 157376 answers

Note that Beta and Developer Edition get an update twice a week. Best would be to move to the Release update channel if you do not want to receive that much updates.

See also:

Note that Beta and Developer Edition get an update twice a week. Best would be to move to the Release update channel if you do not want to receive that much updates. See also: *https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/channel/desktop/
the-edmeister
  • Top 25 Contributor
  • Moderator
5395 solutions 40084 answers

While Chrome browser updates may seem to be more convenient with the manner in which Chrome does its updates, keep in mind that Chrome has an update executable running all the time when your computer is on. And with a broadband internet connection is always connected to the internet when it is turned on. So when there is an update available for the Chrome web browser it gets installed automatically, even when Chrome is not open / not running.

Firefox on the other hand checks for the availability of updates one each day, the first time that Firefox is opened. Yes, when an update is available it does slow down using Firefox while the update is being installed; but IMO that by far better than Google "knowing" when your computer is on and having a connection to your device whenever is turned on.

Sorry, I don't buy the Alphabet, Inc tagline of "Do the right thing", which previously was "Don't be evil" when that conglomerate was still named "Google". They know too much about us already based upon our search history, I'll be damned if I let them know when my PC is running.

While Chrome browser updates may seem to be more convenient with the manner in which Chrome does its updates, keep in mind that Chrome has an update executable running all the time when your computer is on. And with a broadband internet connection is always connected to the internet when it is turned on. So when there is an update available for the Chrome web browser it gets installed automatically, even when Chrome is not open / not running. Firefox on the other hand checks for the availability of updates one each day, the first time that Firefox is opened. Yes, when an update is available it does slow down using Firefox while the update is being installed; but IMO that by far better than Google "knowing" when your computer is on and having a connection to your device whenever is turned on. Sorry, I don't buy the Alphabet, Inc tagline of "Do the right thing", which previously was "Don't be evil" when that conglomerate was still named "Google". They know too much about us already based upon our search history, I'll be damned if I let them know when my PC is running.

Question owner

cor-el said

Note that Beta and Developer Edition get an update twice a week. Best would be to move to the Release update channel if you do not want to receive that much updates. See also:

Good to know, thanks!

''cor-el [[#answer-1098369|said]]'' <blockquote> Note that Beta and Developer Edition get an update twice a week. Best would be to move to the Release update channel if you do not want to receive that much updates. See also: *https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/channel/desktop/ </blockquote> Good to know, thanks!

Question owner

James said

You appear to be using the Firefox 60.0b# builds (60.0b10 is current) instead of the 59.0.2 Release. Beta channel builds can get say nine to fourteen builds on average for a version.

This should help a bit. Thank you.

''James [[#answer-1098342|said]]'' <blockquote> You appear to be using the Firefox 60.0b# builds (60.0'''b10''' is current) instead of the [https://www.mozilla.org/firefox/all/ 59.0.2 Release]. Beta channel builds can get say nine to fourteen builds on average for a version. </blockquote> This should help a bit. Thank you.

Question owner

the-edmeister said

While Chrome browser updates may seem to be more convenient with the manner in which Chrome does its updates, keep in mind that Chrome has an update executable running all the time when your computer is on. And with a broadband internet connection is always connected to the internet when it is turned on. So when there is an update available for the Chrome web browser it gets installed automatically, even when Chrome is not open / not running. Firefox on the other hand checks for the availability of updates one each day, the first time that Firefox is opened. Yes, when an update is available it does slow down using Firefox while the update is being installed; but IMO that by far better than Google "knowing" when your computer is on and having a connection to your device whenever is turned on. Sorry, I don't buy the Alphabet, Inc tagline of "Do the right thing", which previously was "Don't be evil" when that conglomerate was still named "Google". They know too much about us already based upon our search history, I'll be damned if I let them know when my PC is running.

Hmm.. interesting. Never knew how that works, but honestly I'm okay with Chrome knowing when my computer is on.

''the-edmeister [[#answer-1098527|said]]'' <blockquote> While Chrome browser updates may seem to be more convenient with the manner in which Chrome does its updates, keep in mind that Chrome has an update executable running all the time when your computer is on. And with a broadband internet connection is always connected to the internet when it is turned on. So when there is an update available for the Chrome web browser it gets installed automatically, even when Chrome is not open / not running. Firefox on the other hand checks for the availability of updates one each day, the first time that Firefox is opened. Yes, when an update is available it does slow down using Firefox while the update is being installed; but IMO that by far better than Google "knowing" when your computer is on and having a connection to your device whenever is turned on. Sorry, I don't buy the Alphabet, Inc tagline of "Do the right thing", which previously was "Don't be evil" when that conglomerate was still named "Google". They know too much about us already based upon our search history, I'll be damned if I let them know when my PC is running. </blockquote> Hmm.. interesting. Never knew how that works, but honestly I'm okay with Chrome knowing when my computer is on.
Shadow110 1072 solutions 14836 answers

Hi, please do not quote everything, only use to draw attention to critical or unsure of information and can edit that to just what you need as this will prevent going to 2 or 3 pages very quickly. Thanks.

fyi : and that file or another one also tells Google everywhere you go which does not happen with Firefox.

Hi, please do not quote everything, only use to draw attention to critical or unsure of information and can edit that to just what you need as this will prevent going to 2 or 3 pages very quickly. Thanks. fyi : and that file or another one also tells Google everywhere you go which does not happen with Firefox.