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What is happening? While using Firefox hackers took over my computer showed me that they had all my passwords and wanted 500 for security

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While browsing on Firefox and error message appeared that said my computer was in jeprody and to call this number immediately (866 368 2344). My wife freaked out and did it. Big mistake. It wasn't Microsoft. They showed me that all my passwords were known by them and ,presumably the bad guys, and wanted $500 for security help. I refused and they got short with me and hung up. I froze my credit cards and bank accounts and changed all my passwords, did a couple different malware and virus scans (Malwarebytes found 126 problems which I quarantined). After that no other problems were found. I downloaded a free copy of BitDefender thinking I'd do some research in the morning and buy whatever the best antiviral program was out there. It was 11:30 pm by this time. I also erased and reinstalled Firefox. This morning the same screen popped up while browsing in Firefox. Same phone number. I'm absolutely freaked out and don't have a clue as to what to do next. It took me half hour to get a bug reporting account open cause I couldn't type the same password. twice. Turned off the computer and will take it to the local guru on Monday morning but thought I'd inquire with the MOZILLA Community to see if this had happened to anyone else. Maybe it doesn't have anything to do with Firefox. Dunno. It's an almost new HP 17 bs043d running Windows 10. Any help would be appreciated beyond measure. Thanks, Tim Cooper

While browsing on Firefox and error message appeared that said my computer was in jeprody and to call this number immediately (866 368 2344). My wife freaked out and did it. Big mistake. It wasn't Microsoft. They showed me that all my passwords were known by them and ,presumably the bad guys, and wanted $500 for security help. I refused and they got short with me and hung up. I froze my credit cards and bank accounts and changed all my passwords, did a couple different malware and virus scans (Malwarebytes found 126 problems which I quarantined). After that no other problems were found. I downloaded a free copy of BitDefender thinking I'd do some research in the morning and buy whatever the best antiviral program was out there. It was 11:30 pm by this time. I also erased and reinstalled Firefox. This morning the same screen popped up while browsing in Firefox. Same phone number. I'm absolutely freaked out and don't have a clue as to what to do next. It took me half hour to get a bug reporting account open cause I couldn't type the same password. twice. Turned off the computer and will take it to the local guru on Monday morning but thought I'd inquire with the MOZILLA Community to see if this had happened to anyone else. Maybe it doesn't have anything to do with Firefox. Dunno. It's an almost new HP 17 bs043d running Windows 10. Any help would be appreciated beyond measure. Thanks, Tim Cooper

Additional System Details

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  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; Android 4.3; Nexus 7 Build/JWR66Y) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/61.0.3163.98 Safari/537.36

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FredMcD
  • Top 10 Contributor
4274 solutions 59942 answers

Helpful Reply

Did they tell you any of your passwords? If not, it might be a false claim. As to how they got in your system,

It’s very sad, but many software downloaders/ installers will trick you into installing not only their program, but other programs as well.

You have heard of the fine print in shady contracts, right? Well, some installers you need to look at the itsy bitsy teeny weeny fine print.

You are thinking you are giving the installer permission to install the program you want by using the recommended option. But if you use the Manual Option Instead, you discover all kinds of stuff that you do not even know what it is or what it does.

From now on, everyone needs to Use The Manual Option to put a stop to this.

Note that these programs can also change browser/computer settings.


Every now and then, run malware and normal anti-virus scanners. Make sure you are protected.


Further information can be found in this article; https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/troubleshoot-firefox-issues-caused-malware?cache=no

Run most or all of the listed malware scanners. Each works differently. If one program misses something, another may pick it up.

Did they tell you any of your passwords? If not, it might be a false claim. As to how they got in your system, It’s very sad, but many software downloaders/ installers will trick you into installing not only their program, but '''other programs as well. ''' You have heard of the '''fine print in shady''' '''contracts, ''' right? Well, some installers you need to look at the '''itsy bitsy teeny weeny fine print. ''' You are thinking you are giving the installer permission to install the program you want by using the '''recommended''' option. But if you use the '''Manual Option Instead, ''' you discover all kinds of stuff that '''you do not even know what it is or what it does. ''' From now on, everyone needs to '''Use The Manual Option''' to put a stop to this. '''Note''' that these programs can also change browser/computer settings. ------------- Every now and then, run malware and normal anti-virus scanners. Make sure you are protected. ------------ Further information can be found in this article; https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/troubleshoot-firefox-issues-caused-malware?cache=no Run most or all of the listed malware scanners. Each works differently. If one program misses something, another may pick it up.

Question owner

They didn't tell me any of my passwords, they showed me every one I can ever remember making anywhere, on a single screen and circled a couple of the most important ones with a cursor while I was watching. Then a big handwritten scrawl of some word I didn't know appeared on a diagonal across the screen. If this was an effort to unsettle me, it worked. I thought the Malwarebytes scan and the rest of my efforts had fixed the problem, but I was obviously wrong. The same thing happened 8 hours later.

They didn't tell me any of my passwords, they showed me every one I can ever remember making anywhere, on a single screen and circled a couple of the most important ones with a cursor while I was watching. Then a big handwritten scrawl of some word I didn't know appeared on a diagonal across the screen. If this was an effort to unsettle me, it worked. I thought the Malwarebytes scan and the rest of my efforts had fixed the problem, but I was obviously wrong. The same thing happened 8 hours later.
Shadow110 1072 solutions 14836 answers

You are infected in Windows which accessed Firefox. Buy/Get Malwarebytes.

Please go here and finish getting cleaned up by the pros.

Please let us know if this solved your issue or if need further assistance.

You are infected in Windows which accessed Firefox. Buy/Get Malwarebytes. Please go here and finish getting cleaned up by the pros. *https://forums.malwarebytes.com/topic/9573-im-infected-what-do-i-do-now/ Please let us know if this solved your issue or if need further assistance.

Modified by Shadow110

FredMcD
  • Top 10 Contributor
4274 solutions 59942 answers

Download the malware scanner, update the program, then its database. After that, pull the plug on your modem and anything else giving the computer access to the outside world.

Then, run the mal-scanner with a Full System Scan.

Download the malware scanner, update the program, then its database. After that, pull the plug on your modem and anything else giving the computer access to the outside world. Then, run the mal-scanner with a Full System Scan.
FredMcD
  • Top 10 Contributor
4274 solutions 59942 answers

Forgot to add; Don't hook up to the net until your system is clean.

Use another computer if you need more help.

Forgot to add; Don't hook up to the net until your system is clean. Use another computer if you need more help.
jscher2000
  • Top 10 Contributor
8801 solutions 71984 answers

Helpful Reply

Timacooper said

While browsing on Firefox and error message appeared that said my computer was in jeprody and to call this number immediately (866 368 2344). ... This morning the same screen popped up while browsing in Firefox. Same phone number.

Hi Tim, the web has tons of scams on it. They have been spreading through advertisements on popular websites. After confirming that your system is clean, you could consider using an ad blocking extension to help reduce your exposure to those sites. This one is popular:

https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/ublock-origin/

As with any similar extension, some sites may not work correctly with some content blocked. In that case, assuming it's a site you trust, you could use the extension's toolbar button to unblock some of the blocked content.

It's also a good idea to double-check your existing add-ons:

You can view, disable, and often remove unwanted or unknown extensions on the Add-ons page. Either:

  • Ctrl+Shift+a (Mac: Command+Shift+a)
  • "3-bar" menu button (or Tools menu) > Add-ons
  • type or paste about:addons in the address bar and press Enter/Return

In the left column of the Add-ons page, click Extensions. Then cast a critical eye over the list on the right side. Any extensions Firefox installs for built-in features are hidden from this page, so everything listed here is your choice (and your responsibility) to manage. Anything suspicious or that you just do not remember installing or why? If in doubt, disable (or remove).

''Timacooper [[#question-1210936|said]]'' <blockquote> While browsing on Firefox and error message appeared that said my computer was in jeprody and to call this number immediately (866 368 2344). ... This morning the same screen popped up while browsing in Firefox. Same phone number. </blockquote> Hi Tim, the web has tons of scams on it. They have been spreading through advertisements on popular websites. After confirming that your system is clean, you could consider using an ad blocking extension to help reduce your exposure to those sites. This one is popular: https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/ublock-origin/ As with any similar extension, some sites may not work correctly with some content blocked. In that case, assuming it's a site you trust, you could use the extension's toolbar button to unblock some of the blocked content. It's also a good idea to double-check your existing add-ons: You can view, disable, and often remove unwanted or unknown extensions on the Add-ons page. Either: * Ctrl+Shift+a (Mac: Command+Shift+a) * "3-bar" menu button (or Tools menu) > Add-ons * type or paste '''about:addons''' in the address bar and press Enter/Return In the left column of the Add-ons page, click Extensions. Then cast a critical eye over the list on the right side. Any extensions Firefox installs for built-in features are hidden from this page, so everything listed here is your choice (and your responsibility) to manage. Anything suspicious or that you just do not remember installing or why? If in doubt, disable (or remove).
Tyler Downer
  • Top 25 Contributor
  • Moderator
1538 solutions 10738 answers

Note, this is a very common scam. You may have malware on your computer, which popped the window with the number you called (BTW, never call any numbers than randomly appear on your computer ever), or you just stumbled upon an advertisement with that number.

Either way, these people didn't have access to your computer, they likely talked you through giving them access to your computer (using Ammy, teamviewer, etc.) and then they showed you things on your computer that they didn't have access to before, but now did due to tricking you into giving you access.

I would strongly encourage you change all your passwords, but don't do that until AFTER uninstalling and running malwarebytes (you don't need to buy it, ignore PKshadow), and then making sure you always ALWAYS keep firefox and windows up to date. You don't need to buy an anti-virus, they are a waste of money. just use Windows defender.

Then, I definitely agree you need to install an adblocker, and then NEVER EVER call or click on suspicious links, call suspicious numbers, etc. They design these fake ads to make it seem like they already have access to your computer, but they actually do not until you interact with them.

Note, this is a very common scam. You may have malware on your computer, which popped the window with the number you called (BTW, never call any numbers than randomly appear on your computer ever), or you just stumbled upon an advertisement with that number. Either way, these people didn't have access to your computer, they likely talked you through giving them access to your computer (using Ammy, teamviewer, etc.) and then they showed you things on your computer that they didn't have access to before, but now did due to tricking you into giving you access. I would strongly encourage you change all your passwords, but don't do that until AFTER uninstalling and running malwarebytes (you don't need to buy it, ignore PKshadow), and then making sure you always ALWAYS keep firefox and windows up to date. You don't need to buy an anti-virus, they are a waste of money. just use Windows defender. Then, I definitely agree you need to install an adblocker, and then NEVER EVER call or click on suspicious links, call suspicious numbers, etc. They design these fake ads to make it seem like they already have access to your computer, but they actually do not until you interact with them.