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Please beautify the Javascript alert pop-up

Posted

While I still find Firefox functionally speaking by far the best browser, and even more so now that the program size is much smaller than that of its competitors, there is one thing that has always bothered me: the sheer ugliness of its Javascript alert pop-ups. Could you please remove the blackening of the page (which scares new FF users as well), and give the pop-up itself an aesthetic make-over? I would suggest to make it like the one in Safari or Internet Explorer.

Such a good browser deserves a much more beautiful alert. The current one (v. 39) is too ugly for words and gives a very cheap impression (as does the new Options window appearance, for that matter).

While I still find Firefox functionally speaking by far the best browser, and even more so now that the program size is much smaller than that of its competitors, there is one thing that has always bothered me: the sheer ugliness of its Javascript alert pop-ups. Could you please remove the blackening of the page (which scares new FF users as well), and give the pop-up itself an aesthetic make-over? I would suggest to make it like the one in Safari or Internet Explorer. Such a good browser deserves a much more beautiful alert. The current one (v. 39) is too ugly for words and gives a very cheap impression (as does the new Options window appearance, for that matter).

Additional System Details

Installed Plug-ins

  • Adobe PDF Plug-In For Firefox and Netscape 11.0.11
  • Google Update
  • Shockwave Flash 18.0 r0
  • 5.1.40416.0
  • VLC media player Web Plugin 2.1.3
  • iTunes Detector Plug-in

Application

  • User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:39.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/39.0

More Information

Scribe 736 solutions 3518 answers

Hi, thank you for your suggestions, however this is Mozilla Support where we try to solve problems, so if you have feedback for Mozilla please could you post it here, where it will be seen by the developers.

Hi, thank you for your suggestions, however this is Mozilla Support where we try to solve problems, so if you have feedback for Mozilla please could you post it [https://input.mozilla.org/ here, ]where it will be seen by the developers.

Question owner

Will do, Scribe. Thanks for the redirect.

Will do, Scribe. Thanks for the redirect.
jscher2000
  • Top 10 Contributor
8885 solutions 72683 answers

Hmm, I'm not sure the modal alert() dialog is considered a good user experience. Perhaps making it more beautiful will encourage more use, rather than use of info-bars or other in-page displays, which are less disruptive?

I don't know the best way to engage the user experience team on an issue like this. If you are highly motivated to work on this further:

The team members are listed here: https://blog.mozilla.org/ux/who-we-are/

They have a Twitter account here: https://twitter.com/MozillaUX

Hmm, I'm not sure the modal alert() dialog is considered a good user experience. Perhaps making it more beautiful will encourage more use, rather than use of info-bars or other in-page displays, which are less disruptive? I don't know the best way to engage the user experience team on an issue like this. If you are highly motivated to work on this further: The team members are listed here: https://blog.mozilla.org/ux/who-we-are/ They have a Twitter account here: https://twitter.com/MozillaUX

Question owner

@jscher2000 -- The unique 'selling point' of an alert is that it blocks the functionality of the rest of the page. Which I need like oxygen, as a professional form maker. I am now working on an extensive medical form in which patients first have to answer two questions before they continue, because some of the other questions adapt themselves to the selected answers.

And as HTML5/CSS3 form end-validation-before-sending is still poor in older browser versions, I depend on Javascript alerts there, too. There is no alternative, for the years to come.

@jscher2000 -- The unique 'selling point' of an alert is that it blocks the functionality of the rest of the page. Which I need like oxygen, as a professional form maker. I am now working on an extensive medical form in which patients first have to answer two questions before they continue, because some of the other questions adapt themselves to the selected answers. And as HTML5/CSS3 form end-validation-before-sending is still poor in older browser versions, I depend on Javascript alerts there, too. There is no alternative, for the years to come.