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I'ved used Firefox for over 10 years, and I just realized today that my privacy is GONE.

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These personalized newsfeeds, whatever they are-- Google does them all. Some are not as intrusive as others. But within Firefox, I get some of the most bizarre news stories... stories about things I'm not even talking to other people about or looking up online. How could it possibly find a connection? Even when there is a minute connection. It's not a coincidence. It's like, is my phone hacked-- are people reading my mind? It's some form of breach of privacy.

Granted, all the accounts I use are logged into Firefox. Tonight, I took a gander over the privacy settings, and as usual my jaw dropped in disbelief. Permissions; Locations, Camera, etc.-- instead of valuing peoples' privacy and not caring one ioda like Fuckfacebook, many privacy-invading functions are ON by default until they are turned off by the user. This is why I don't use apps. It's why I quit Facebook many years ago. And now, I say goodbye to Firebox. Sick and tired of people encroaching on my privacy. It's principal, nothing more, nothing less-- THIS BROWSER IS GONE. Stay out of my personal business.

These personalized newsfeeds, whatever they are-- Google does them all. Some are not as intrusive as others. But within Firefox, I get some of the most bizarre news stories... stories about things I'm not even talking to other people about or looking up online. How could it possibly find a connection? Even when there is a minute connection. It's not a coincidence. It's like, is my phone hacked-- are people reading my mind? It's some form of breach of privacy. Granted, all the accounts I use are logged into Firefox. Tonight, I took a gander over the privacy settings, and as usual my jaw dropped in disbelief. Permissions; Locations, Camera, etc.-- instead of valuing peoples' privacy and not caring one ioda like Fuckfacebook, many privacy-invading functions are ON by default until they are turned off by the user. This is why I don't use apps. It's why I quit Facebook many years ago. And now, I say goodbye to Firebox. Sick and tired of people encroaching on my privacy. It's principal, nothing more, nothing less-- THIS BROWSER IS GONE. Stay out of my personal business.

Mehr Details zum System

Installierte Plugins

  • Shockwave Flash 30.0 r0

Anwendung

  • User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.3; Win64; x64; rv:61.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/61.0

Weitere Informationen

WestEnd
  • Top 25 Contributor
60 Lösungen 5379 Antworten
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I looked at FF user forum settings and there is nothing to what your saying about privacy settings. Also I looked at my Browser control privacy setting and see nothing changed on those. I think the user themselves here made those change or accepted the changes and now come back to say it was FF/Mozilla that did it. One need to remember things don't just change unless you permit those changes known or unbeknown to the user.

I looked at FF user forum settings and there is nothing to what your saying about privacy settings. Also I looked at my Browser control privacy setting and see nothing changed on those. I think the user themselves here made those change or accepted the changes and now come back to say it was FF/Mozilla that did it. One need to remember things don't just change unless you permit those changes known or unbeknown to the user.
James
  • Moderator
1596 Lösungen 11250 Antworten
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nihiloth85 said

like, is my phone hacked ..... Tonight, I took a gander over the privacy settings, and as usual my jaw dropped in disbelief. Permissions; Locations, Camera, etc.

Is this actually about Firefox for Android or desktop Firefox for Windows, Mac OSX, Linux.

Since your post seems to be more about Android Firefox see https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/how-firefox-android-use-permissions-it-requests

''nihiloth85 [[#question-1227680|said]]'' <blockquote>like, is my '''phone''' hacked ..... Tonight, I took a gander over the privacy settings, and as usual my jaw dropped in disbelief. Permissions; '''Locations, Camera''', etc. </blockquote> Is this actually about Firefox for Android or desktop Firefox for Windows, Mac OSX, Linux. Since your post seems to be more about Android Firefox see https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/how-firefox-android-use-permissions-it-requests

Geändert am von James

Tyler Downer
  • Top 25 Contributor
  • Moderator
1530 Lösungen 10673 Antworten
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Please note, Firefox does respect your privacy. The permissions you see are explained in the article above. Note that Mozilla has always been a leader in protecting your privacy, and continues to be so, with features such as tracking protection (What happened to Tracking Protection?) and other projects such as Facebook container and Firefox monitor (among many others).

If you have specific concerns please feel free to bring them to this forum

Please note, Firefox does respect your privacy. The permissions you see are explained in the article above. Note that Mozilla has always been a leader in protecting your privacy, and continues to be so, with features such as tracking protection ([[Tracking Protection]]) and other projects such as Facebook container and Firefox monitor (among many others). If you have specific concerns please feel free to bring them to this forum
jscher2000
  • Top 10 Contributor
8703 Lösungen 71122 Antworten
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The following information is for Windows:

Most permissions (other than cookies) have a default setting of asking you when a site wants to take that type of action action.

For example, if you go to a site that wants to be able to display notifications, Firefox will drop a panel from the left end of the address bar asking whether you want the site to be able to display notifications. Similarly for camera, microphone, and location.

This approach gives you the most flexibility to control your experience, but if you want to block by default, you can set that through the "Settings" button next to each permission on the Options page. Then Firefox will silently deny sites' requests to use those features.


There is a way to default those permission to Allow, but it's very unlikely you have that. To double check:

(1) In a new tab, type or paste about:config in the address bar and press Enter/Return. Click the button promising to be careful or accepting the risk.

(2) In the search box above the list, type or paste perm and pause while the list is filtered

(3) Check that these preferences have their default value of 0 (0 is ask you) and not 1 (1 is Allow) and unless you checked the button to Block sites from even asking, not 2 (2 is Block)

  • permissions.default.camera
  • permissions.default.desktop-notification
  • permissions.default.geo -- location
  • permissions.default.microphone

permissions.default.image is an older preference with different values. See: http://kb.mozillazine.org/Permissions.default.image

permissions.default.shortcuts -- related to whether websites can override built-in keyboard shortcuts -- should be ignored for now because if you block it, the Backspace and Delete keys stop working normally

Hopefully with this information you have confidence that Firefox is set to work the way you want.


As for weird coincidence in news stories, do you mean in the Recommended by Pocket stories? In the U.S., when Firefox retrieves the list of "top stories" popular with Pocket users, each one comes with a list of related sites. Firefox compares the related sites list with your history -- locally, not sent to Mozilla or Pocket -- to decide which of the top stories are most likely to interest you. So that could indeed lead to seeing stories that are not purely random.

Mozilla is still trying to figure out how best to show you relevant recommendations without sending personal data out to the web. What do you think of this method now that you know how it works?

''The following information is for Windows:'' Most permissions (other than cookies) have a default setting of asking you when a site wants to take that type of action action. For example, if you go to a site that wants to be able to display notifications, Firefox will drop a panel from the left end of the address bar asking whether you want the site to be able to display notifications. Similarly for camera, microphone, and location. This approach gives you the most flexibility to control your experience, but if you want to block by default, you can set that through the "Settings" button next to each permission on the Options page. Then Firefox will silently deny sites' requests to use those features. ---- There is a way to default those permission to Allow, but it's very unlikely you have that. To double check: (1) In a new tab, type or paste '''about:config''' in the address bar and press Enter/Return. Click the button promising to be careful or accepting the risk. (2) In the search box above the list, type or paste '''perm''' and pause while the list is filtered (3) Check that these preferences have their default value of '''0''' (0 is ask you) and not '''1''' (1 is Allow) and unless you checked the button to Block sites from even asking, not '''2''' (2 is Block) * permissions.default.'''camera''' * permissions.default.'''desktop-notification''' * permissions.default.'''geo''' -- location * permissions.default.'''microphone''' permissions.default.'''image''' is an older preference with different values. See: http://kb.mozillazine.org/Permissions.default.image permissions.default.'''shortcuts''' -- related to whether websites can override built-in keyboard shortcuts -- should be ignored for now because if you block it, the Backspace and Delete keys stop working normally Hopefully with this information you have confidence that Firefox is set to work the way you want. ---- As for weird coincidence in news stories, do you mean in the Recommended by Pocket stories? In the U.S., when Firefox retrieves the list of "top stories" popular with Pocket users, each one comes with a list of related sites. Firefox compares the related sites list with your history -- locally, not sent to Mozilla or Pocket -- to decide which of the top stories are most likely to interest you. So that could indeed lead to seeing stories that are not purely random. Mozilla is still trying to figure out how best to show you relevant recommendations without sending personal data out to the web. What do you think of this method now that you know how it works?